2024-2025 Course Catalog

  • BUSINESS

    The Business Department believes that it has an important responsibility to educate students as to the many career opportunities available in our global economy.  Also, students may take courses that will enhance their business computer skills and making them more marketable in the future. Business students will explore careers in Accounting, Law, Management, Marketing, Finance and a variety of other business professions.  In addition, the course offerings will provide all students with a foundation in 21st century skills enabling them to better adjust to the global business and legal community in which they live.  Students may receive up to twelve college credits before graduating from North High school. DECA is our award winning Business club and all students are encouraged to participate. Students may elect any combination of courses within this department to earn either a three or five credit sequence toward graduation. Students who take five credits in Business may fulfill a requirement towards a Regents Diploma.

    BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION PROGRAM

    Students may choose from an array of courses which are taught in a college preparatory manner.  The advanced and honors level courses within this department are taught in a manner which closely parallels college level courses.  In addition, students may earn valuable college credits through a variety of business course offerings.  Students may select from among the following courses as long as any necessary prerequisites have been satisfied: Introduction to Business, Business Ownership, Sports Marketing, Fashion Marketing, College Accounting, College Accounting Advanced-Honors, College Law, Law Seminar-Honors and College Marketing/Management.  We have many liberal arts and fine arts students who are taking at least one of these courses in order to increase their business awareness.

    COMPUTER SKILLS PROGRAM

    To satisfy their computer literacy requirement, students may elect the following courses to enhance and refine their computer skills:  College Prep-Computer Applications, Multimedia and Web Design, Sports Marketing, Fashion Marketing, Investments and the Business of Music.  These courses may be elected on a “stand alone” basis or may be combined with other offerings in this department to create a sequence.

     

    COMPUTER APPLICATIONS – Semester Course

    Most colleges and businesses use some part of the Microsoft Office software package.  This hands-on computer course will focus on the computer applications students will need to survive in high school, college, and beyond.  The application skills acquired in this course are relevant and essential to your future success.  Students will work with Excel (spreadsheet), PowerPoint (presentations), Access (relational database) and Word.  Each one of these applications has practical educational and business use.  In addition to the Microsoft Office package, Desktop Publishing will be taught to create letterheads, stationary, business cards, brochures, and newsletters.  Clip art, graphics, digital cameras, and scanners will be used to enhance the applications.

    ½ unit of credit; No prerequisite

    Note:  This course meets the computer literacy requirement.

     

    THE BUSINESS OF MUSIC – Semester Course

    This one-semester course is designed for students who are interested in gaining an academic appreciation of music and the “business” of music.  Emphasis will be placed on the legal and economic issues of the music industry, consumer buying trends, and ethics in the digital world.  Topics to be covered will include major and independent labels, ticket selling agencies (Ticketmaster, Live Nation & Stub Hub), illegal music downloading, copyrights, ASCAP and BMI.

    Course materials will be drawn from a variety of resources and will include: RIAA, The Berklee College of Music, Billboard Magazine, Rolling Stone Magazine, The Music Journal, VH1, and MTV.

    ½ unit of credit; Prerequisite:  10th, 11th or 12th grade

    Note:  This course meets the computer literacy requirement

     

    INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS – Semester Course

    This semester course is designed to give students a broad understanding of the many different options in the business world.  The course will include but will not be limited to our monetary system, credit, investments, business law, and types of business organizations, consumerism, insurance, advertising, economics and communication.  In addition, students will explore a chosen career and evaluate their suitability for that career based upon an investigation of their own goals, interests and abilities.  This course will aid in creating necessary tools to succeed in any business endeavor including résumé building, interviewing skills as well as public speaking.  Some possible activities may include entrepreneur projects such as “Shark Tank”, international business etiquette and an investigatory career project, which will include interviews with people in the student’s chosen career.  Knowledge obtained will be used in almost every career, whether it is after college or high school.

    ½ unit of credit; No prerequisite

    Note:  This course meets the computer literacy requirement

     

    INTRODUCTION TO PERSONAL FINANCE – Semester Course

    This is a ½ year course offered through our Business Department. How financially savvy are you? This course is specifically designed for high school students to gain an understanding about the importance of the financial world, including planning and managing money wisely. Areas of study taught through application in personal finance and financial literacy include sources of income, budgeting, banking, consumer credit, credit laws and rights, personal bankruptcy, insurance, spending, taxes, investment strategies, savings/checking accounts, buying/leasing a vehicle, purchasing a home and the expenses of living independently.

    ½ unit of credit; Prerequisite: 9th and 10th grade

    Note: This course meets the computer literacy requirement

     

    BUSINESS OWNERSHIP – Semester Course

    This course offers you the opportunity to examine both the academic and practical considerations of running your own business.  Students will be responsible for handling all facets of running the school store.  This “hands on” course will have students working on sales, management, financing and advertising with respect to the North High School Store.  Students will work with the entire school community in a “real world” business environment and learn how to run and manage a business on a daily basis.

    ½ unit of credit; No prerequisite

    SPORTS MARKETING – Semester Course

    A one-semester course devoted to examining the economic, managerial and marketing strategies of professional sports’ franchises.  Students will study theories of product development, advertising, pricing, promotion, public relations and publicity in an effort to understand the complex nature of the multi-billion dollar sports and entertainment industry.  The curriculum will investigate the relationships which are developed between franchises and host cities and the resulting benefits which fall to each when fundamental managerial principles are applied.  The entire process of franchise acquisition, debt financing, site selection, facility layout and the costs of construction will be discussed in detail.  Case studies will be used to highlight and emphasize the material covered.  Sports marketing is an innovative course designed to provide students with an insight into the vast business nature of professional sports and the powerful grip it holds on the American psyche as well as the American dollar.

    ½ unit of credit; No prerequisite

    Note:  This course meets the computer literacy requirement.

     

    COLLEGE ACCOUNTING

    This course is designed for the college bound students who plan to major in Business Administration or who may wish to combine Business Administration with a study of languages, computer science, engineering or the arts.

    The course will provide instruction in the recording of transactions and in the techniques of preparing classified financial statements.  It will emphasize analysis and interpretation of financial statements, and accounting situations.  During the year students will work with computers, using special accounting software to analyze and solve accounting problems.  Students will have the opportunity to earn 3 college credits through SUNY Farmingdale at a drastically reduced tuition rate.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  10th, 11th or 12th grade

     

    COLLEGE ACCOUNTING ADVANCED - HONORS

    This course is the second year of College Accounting.  It is a college level course designed for the student who wishes to study accounting with a greater concentration on the theory and philosophy of decisions. Corporation accounting includes the following: inventory valuation, depreciation theory and methods; comparative analysis of corporate statements; interpretation of financial statement preparation and analysis of cash flow statements; the making of management system decisions based on available accounting data, preparation of income taxes; and accounting as a forecasting tool. In addition, manufacturing accounting will be covered as well.   Students will have the opportunity to earn 3 college credits through SUNY Farmingdale at a drastically reduced tuition rate.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  College Accounting

     

    COLLEGE MANAGEMENT/MARKETING

    A college level course that covers all facets of management and marketing in business.  Topics covered include business formation, ethics, information systems, production and marketing, financial management and human resources.  Students will be responsible for working in teams and preparing case study analysis.    Students will have the opportunity to earn 3 college credits through SUNY Farmingdale at a drastically reduced tuition rate.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Sports Marketing or Fashion Marketing 10th, 11th, or 12th grade

     

    COLLEGE LAW

    This is a subject of value and importance to every student.  It encompasses a comprehensive approach to the study of law and legal problems.  Topics will include: the origin and development of our laws; and overview of the structure of various legal systems; laws pertaining to minors and an introduction to civil and criminal procedures.  This will be followed by a series of special in-depth studies; torts, negligence, criminal justice, contracts, property and negotiable instruments.

    Cases add to the interest and practicability of the course.  This subject will be of special benefit to those planning to major in Business Administration, Law and International Law in college.  Trips to the district courts will provide students an opportunity to view “real” cases in a courtroom setting.  Students will have the opportunity to earn 3 college credits through LIU Post College at a drastically reduced tuition rate.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  10th, 11th, or 12th grade

     

    LAW SEMINAR - HONORS

    A college level course for the Law Career minded student.  Topics will be selected from the LAW course of study to be researched and studied in depth.  Particular stress shall be given to the areas of torts, contracts, libel and Criminal Law.  Students will develop legal research techniques in which they will utilize law libraries and legal documents.  Also to be included will be an analysis of court structure and procedure, the assignment of cases, the administration of the courts, the appellate process, development of trial techniques (direct examination, cross examination etc.), and the preparation for and participation in several case trials.  Many actual cases will be thoroughly studied, investigated and analyzed.  Students will be encouraged to do additional research work in their special interest areas.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  College Law

     

    INVESTMENTS – Semester Course

    The DOW dropped 200 points, the NASDAQ is up, gold is at an all-time high, and real estate has experienced a major bubble. If you want to learn more about these issues and what is happening in the world with respect to investments this is the course for you. Topics to be covered will include the following:  advantages and disadvantages of investing in stocks, bonds and mutual funds --for long term investment and short term profits; who should invest in the stock market and when; buying and selling of commodities (coffee, sugar, soy beans), investing in real estate, and the importance of investing in retirement accounts.  Students will be shown how to begin an investment program and will be able to develop their own investment plans with long-term objectives in mind.  Students will also have an opportunity to compete against other schools through the virtual Stock Market Game. Investment research will take place using the internet.

    ½ unit of credit; No Prerequisite:

    Note:  This course meets the computer literacy requirement

    MULTIMEDIA AND WEB DESIGN – Semester Course

    This course is designed for all grade levels. Students will have hands-on experience in preparing multimedia presentations and web page design.   Students will learn how to make advanced PowerPoint presentations that will include text, graphics, photographs, and transitions.  The Internet will be used to gather information and design elements, which include audio, video and graphics.  The students will learn to present their projects in a professional, business-like manner.  Students will learn how to design and create web pages using Adobe Dreamweaver.  Topics will include backgrounds, text, headings, lists, images, horizontal rules, image maps, tables, frames, anchors, links and web file formats.

    ½ unit of credit; No prerequisite

    Note:  This course meets the computer literacy requirement

    FASHION MARKETING

    The fashion industry has an impact on students’ lives and the American and global economy.  This course will introduce students to the marketing strategies used to develop, distribute and showcase today’s fashion.  In this specialized course, students gain basic knowledge of the apparel and accessories industry and skills necessary for successful employment in apparel businesses.  Students will develop general marketing skills necessary for successful employment in fashion marketing, sales promotion, purchasing, physical distribution, market planning, and product/service technology. Computer/technology applications supporting this course are also studied.

    ½ unit of credit; No prerequisite

    Note:  This course meets the computer literacy requirement

    HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM

    This course provides advanced experiences in food production, management and service. Key components of this course are: menu planning, inventory, purchasing and receiving, and food service operations. It will include a student run restaurant, created with the goal of providing real time, hands on experience of the operations of a fine dining establishment. It will provide practical knowledge and skills used to understand restaurant volumes and pricing strategy. This course offers opportunities to apply instructional competencies and workplace readiness skills, and enhances leadership development skills. While providing an understanding of the scope and complexity of the industry, the course covers key hospitality and management issues. Students will be able to explore career opportunities available in restaurants, hotels, beverages operations, casinos, theme parks, entertainment centers, cruise lines, and countless other hospitality and tourism businesses.

    ½ unit of credit; No prerequisite

    CAREER EXPLORATION PROGRAM: INTERNSHIP

    This internship course offers an experiential learning opportunity in an approved business, government agency, or non-profit organization. Students will be required to complete an application and interview with the internship coordinator/teacher to discuss their career interests.  Mentor availability, report card grades, teacher comments and school attendance will all be considered during the selection process.  Upon acceptance into, the internship coordinator/teacher will match the students’ interests with an appropriate mentor in that field.  Depending on the internship selected, students may complete the internship after school, on weekends and/or school vacations.  Students will be required to attend workshops throughout the process; as this course does not meet on a daily basis.  Students must provide their own transportation to and from their internship site. Students will engage in a rigorous, relevant and “real world” learning experience that further enhances their knowledge of a particular career path and will be required to complete a minimum of 54 hours for credit.

    ½  - 1 unit of credit (depending on intern hours); Prerequisite:  Must be a senior and be approved through  application

     

    COMPUTER SCIENCE PROGRAM

    • Computer Science is NOT just about writing code!
    • Believe it or not…Computer Science exists in just about every area of interest! Computer Science may be a wonderful area of exploration for you If you have an interest in some or all of the following:
      • Psychology
      • Art
      • Creative Writing
      • Security
      • Databases/Data Analysis
      • Math & Logic
      • Healthcare
      • Research
      • Finance/Stocks
      • Networking/Internet Infrastructure
    • Computing jobs are among the highest starting salaries of any entry-level bachelor degree! (via USNews)
      • Computer Network Architect Median Salary: $120,520
      • Software Developer Median Salary: $120,730
      • Information Security Analyst Median Salary: $102,600
      • Database Administrator Median Salary: $96,710
      • IT Manager Median Salary: $159,010
    • Computing jobs have very high satisfaction rates when compared to other jobs as they are interesting, intellectually challenging and creative!
    • Exposing students to computer science education during their high school career gives them critical thinking skills needed for their success in the 21st century and for strengthening the workforce!

    Technology is a rapidly advancing field that continues to grow at an exponential rate each and every day. North High is proud to offer several courses offered that help students become accustomed to the field of Computer Science and help them explore their creativity and thinking skills in a new and exciting way.

     

    INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE I – Fall Semester

    Imagine you are on a job interview, and a member of the panel asks you the following:

    You have 10 quarters flat on a table, where 8 of them are heads up, and 2 are tails up. You are blindfolded and unable to see the state (which side is up) of each coin. How can we divide the coins into 2 piles such that each pile contains an equal quantity of coins whose state are tails up?

    While Computer Science is often associated with software development, the need for problem solving, logic, and communication skills has become critically important in today’s society.

    To that point, software has also become an integral part of education and society over the past decade. From word processing to cell phone applications, the demand for programmers grows each and every day. This course serves as a platform for students to take an introductory look at how software is developed, from both a logical/design point of view, as well as from a technical and practical point of view. Students will explore the beginning aspects of how to plan to write code while problem solving, read and write code, documentation, debugging, and working in teams to reach a common goal.

    The course also allows students to discuss many ethical dilemnas found in the Computer Science world, and learn what types of careers and jobs are available and best suit their interests. Special attention is given to creative thinking, out of the box non-linear problem solving, and algorithm development. The course culminates in a final project where students will use everything they learned over the course of the semester to create an educational piece of software from scratch (Jeopardy, flashcards, etc.). This course can be taken for computer credit and satisfies the computer requirement for graduation.

    1/2 unit of credit; Prerequisite(s):  Pre-algebra, no prior programming experience required

    INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE II – Spring Semester

    The concepts behind Computer Science help students to plan, think, process, and create. Being able to understand these overarching conceptual themes will unlock many different areas of Computer Science for exploration. The primary coding language in use today is Java, developed by Sun Microsystems. Java is the backbone of everything you see today, from applications to video games. In this course, we will study the beginning conceptual elements required to succesfully understand and use Java. Students will be introduced to such concepts as object oriented programming, algorithm development, and class hierarchies. Additionally, we will investigate mathematical topics such as working in other number systems such as binary and hexadecimal, logic proofs and circuit diagrams, as well as the math behind common encryption algorithms.

    1/2 unit of credit; Prerequisite(s):  Completion of Computer Science I, Pre-Algebra

    ADVANCED PLACEMENT COMPUTER SCIENCE PRINCIPLES – Full Year Course

    (offered in 2024-2025)

    In contrast to courses solely based on programming, AP Computer Science Principles is an alternative study of the computer science field that focuses on using and understanding technology and programming as a means to develop problem solving techniques.  The course does not focus on a particular programming language or have any programming prerequisites with the intent to make the course more welcoming to a broader student population.  Special focus will be given to algorithm development, a detailed understanding of the inner workings of the Internet & data transfer, social and ethical implications of technology, and software engineering. We take a deep look at how human psychology factors into software development, how cybersecurity is quickly becoming the most important issue dealt with on a daily basis, and how to work with incredibly large data sets to analyze so we can draw inferences and make insights. It will also allow students to embrace their creative side with assignments and projects during the year that will factor into their AP Exam grade along with the traditional written exam taken in May.  A summer assignment prior to the start of the class is required.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite(s):  Completion of Algebra 1, course open to 10th-12th grades

    ADVANCED PLACEMENT COMPUTER SCIENCE A – Full Year Course  (offered in 2025-2026)

    Consider the following: to win a contest, you have 20 chances to guess a random number between 1 and 1 million. For each guess, you will be notified if your guess was correct, too high, or too low. Does an algorithm exist such that we can win the contest everytime?

    These are the types of complicated yet intriguing questions that will be answered in AP Computer Science. This course takes students deep into the infrastructure of the Java langauge, including memory efficency, searching and sorting, data structures, and polymorphism. Students will work on challenging real world lab activities that simulate classic Computer Science problems and mimic actual work enviroments which provide valuable insight and experience. In May, students will be required to take the AP Exam, which can qualify them for college credits. A summer assignment prior to the start of the class is required.

    Students interested in this course should:

    • Be familiar with mathematical notation and concepts through the Algebra 2 level and preferably beyond.
    • Have formal experience in problem solving/coding.
    • Be able to structure and develop a given topic/problem solution in a logical manner.

     

    Every student will be expected to devote time outside of the classroom setting to work on programming assignments.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite(s):  Completion of Algebra 2, Introduction to Computer Science I and II and a recommendation from the teacher.  Exceptions require permission from the Department Chairperson.

    ENGLISH

    The English Department offers a four-year program of comprehensive literature and composition courses. Students read widely in fiction and non-fiction, as well as in poetry and drama.  Library and research skills are developed throughout the four years and students write literary research papers in grades 11 and 12.  Extensive instruction and practice in composition are offered, and students meet regularly with their teachers to develop writing skills in all modes.  Students may elect additional semester courses in creative writing in their junior and senior years and journalism in their sophomore, junior, and senior years.

    Students have the opportunity to seek Honors or Advanced Placement study in any year of the high school program.  In grades 10-12, placement is determined by essay examination and teacher recommendation.

    A summer reading requirement for all students is distributed in mid-May.

     

    REGENTS WRITING WORKSHOP/ENL

    This course is specifically designed to enable students to spend a year mastering the literature and essay requirements for the English Regents exam.  The class will meet on alternate days and will teach the fundamentals of English, assist in the comprehension of literature texts, and work on the basics of essay writing.

    ½ unit of credit

    REGENTS WRITING WORKSHOP/SPECIAL EDUCATION

    This course is specifically designed to enable special education students to master the skills required for the English Regents exam.  The class will meet on alternate days and will be staffed with an English teacher and special education teacher both of whom will work on the tasks of the Regents exam as well as on the literature that the students will be expected to cover in their English classes.  These skills include essay writing, text analysis, and reading comprehension.

    ½ unit of credit

    CREATIVE WRITING – Evening

    This is an advanced writing course for 11th and 12th graders with excellent skills in expository writing, who wish to gain or to expand their experience in writing fiction, poetry, and literary non-fiction.  Weekly and long-term reading assignments will also be designed to offer students an introduction to contemporary literature.

    The course is conducted in a workshop format: all students are expected to submit their writing for critiques by their peers and to offer meaningful responses to the work of other members of the class.  Writers will also be encouraged to submit work to contests and publications.  This is an elective that does not replace any required English course, but may be used toward a five-year sequence. 

    ½ unit of credit                                                                                  Prerequisite:  English 10

     

    JOURNALISM – Evening

    JOURNALISM  1

    The course will allow students to explore the role of the news media (print, internet, radio, television, film and advertising) from its beginnings to its potential in our future. Students become familiar with the organization of news production, law and ethics, the history of the American newspaper and the role of journalism in American society, interviewing, reporting and editing. Students in the course will gain practical experience by producing articles for Guide Post, the school newspaper, and an individually designed newspaper.

    1 unit of credit                                                                                   No Prerequisite

     

    JOURNALISM  2

    The course builds on the information learned in Journalism 1 by introducing and developing skills in layout and design. Students will learn different types of design style (front page, inside page, and double page spread) using modular presentation. Students in the course will gain practical experience by creating the overall design of Guide Post. In addition, students will learn about using photos and illustrations and caption writing as an additional visually informative tool. Students will also be expected to execute an in-depth writing assignment.         

    1 unit of credit                                                                                   Prerequisite:  Journalism 1

     

    JOURNALISM  HONORS

    Students in this course complete project assignments that include developing a staff manual, developing and executing team building activities for Guide Post, developing and leading training schedules, creating leadership plans, creating financial and advertising plans, and developing an online publication.

    1 unit of credit                                                                                   Prerequisite:  Journalism 2

    GRADE 9

    NOTE:  All grade 9 English and social studies classes are paired and scheduled to meet during consecutive periods.  This permits flexible use of class time and grouping of students as well as creates opportunities for coordinated instruction.

     

    ENGLISH 9 REGENTS

    This is a comprehensive course in literature and composition with particular emphasis on expository writing and on analytical reading in all literary genres.  English 9 Regents includes a review of English grammar and usage. Students will be expected to read extensively and independently, preparing works for class discussion as well as meeting supplementary outside reading requirements.  Readings in drama will include at least one Shakespearean play.  Students may expect opportunities to develop their skills in narrative, persuasive, and descriptive writing as well as to extend their ability to assert and argue effectively and to write topic sentences and thesis statements.

    1 unit of credit                                                                                   Prerequisite:  English 8

     

    ENGLISH 9 HONORS

    English 9 Honors is not offered as a separate course.  Students in 9 Regents have the opportunity to pursue honors level study and credit by achievement.

     

    GRADE 10

    A sophomore is required to register for one of the following full-year courses: 

    ENGLISH 10 - REGENTS

    This Regents level course builds on the composition skills taught in ninth grade.  Students may expect extensive practice in a variety of rhetorical modes and in developing the length and complexity of their essays.  Students will also have opportunities to develop imaginative and personal writing.  Clarity, variety in sentence structure, appropriate diction, and coherence are emphasized.  The study of literature seeks to enhance students' appreciation of the complexity of human experience and includes significant works of drama, including at least one Shakespearean play, fiction, non-fiction, and poetry. Additional areas of study will include grammatical lessons and impromptu writing.  As in all English courses, students in English 10 will have assignments in vocabulary development, lessons in standard English usage, and outside reading assignments.

    1 unit of credit                                                                                   Prerequisite:  English 9

     

    ENGLISH 10 HONORS

    This course is designed for those students who have demonstrated exceptional proficiency and interest in literature and composition.  The honors level course is for students who take genuine pleasure in reading extensively literary works of variety and challenge and whose writing shows exceptional clarity and maturity of expression.  Honors students must be able to work and grow in a highly competitive atmosphere.  Honors placement is determined by essay examination and teacher recommendation.

    1 unit of credit                                                               Prerequisite:  English 9 Regents and

                                                                                                    department permission.

     

     

    GRADE 11

    A junior is required to register for one of the following year-long courses:

     

    ENGLISH 11 - REGENTS

    The junior year offers students the opportunity to bring their literary and composition skills to a mature, college preparatory level.  The literature studied is primarily American and is selected to develop awareness and an appreciation of structures, styles, and themes characteristic of American literature.  This reading may be enriched by inclusion of appropriate works of British or European writers.  Our goal is to help students develop sound and mature critical standards.  Student writing is expected to show evidence of logical reasoning, sound analysis, and thoughtful interpretation.  English 11 Regents offers frequent practice in text analysis and argumentative writing to prepare for the Regents Examination in English Language Arts, which students take at the end of the course. 

    1 unit of credit                                                                                    Prerequisite:  English 10

    ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENGLISH/LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION (ENGLISH 11 HONORS)

    This course both parallels and intensifies the 11 Regents program and prepares for the AP Language and Composition Exam, which is required.  Students in this course demonstrate exceptional maturity of literary insight and compositional skill, as well as a commitment to explore great literature and writing.

    This course offers honors level study of literature as well as the AP language program, which engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of periods, disciplines and rhetorical contexts.  Students will have opportunities to write in a variety of forms – narrative, exploratory, expository – as well as to develop skills in formal and informal argument. The course offers frequent practice with rhetorical analysis, synthesis, and argumentative writing to prepare for the AP exam.

    1 unit of credit                                                                                   Prerequisite:  English 10 Regents and department permission. 

    Those not receiving a recommendation will be required to meet with the counselor, department head, and parents to ensure full awareness of the high level of commitment and skill required to succeed in AP English.

    GRADE 12

    ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION (ENGLISH 12 HONORS)

    AP Literature and Composition is a college-level course designed for students who have demonstrated mature understanding and superior ability to express insights, concepts, and themes in literature; who take pleasure in reading, discussing, and writing about literature; and who have demonstrated their critical thinking skills in class discussion and in writing. 

    You must plan to devote a minimum of eight hours per week outside of class to prepare reading and writing assignments within required deadlines.  Class discussion will stress comprehension and interpretation and require accurate recall with ability to make cogent references to a particular text. The AP English student must be a thoughtful and mature contributor to these discussions.

    The AP Exam in Literature and Composition is required of all students.  In addition, a college level research paper on a major literary figure or work(s) is required.  You will also submit a number of critical papers throughout the year.

    1 unit of credit                                                                                   Prerequisite:  English 11 Regents and department recommendation. 

    Those not receiving the department recommendation will be required to meet with counselor, department head, and parents to ensure full awareness of the high level of commitment and skill required to succeed in AP English.

     

    DETECTIVE, MYSTERY, AND TRUE CRIME- ENGLISH 12 SEMESTER COURSE

    The class will begin with a unit exploring the key attributes of detective or mystery fiction, and then examine a sampling of works in the genre.  Students will analyze the characterization of detectives, suspects, and criminals, and consider the author's plotting, building of tension, and inclusion of clues.  The course will include two units:  Detective and Mystery Fiction, and True Crime.  Throughout

    the coursework, students will be engaged in hands-on projects including a murder-mystery event, creating their own short works, podcasting, etc. 

     

    ½ unit of credit

     

    DYSTOPIAN LITERATURE- ENGLISH 12 SEMESTER COURSE

    For centuries, authors have created works of literature, prophetic and otherwise, about the state of the world.  In this exploration of dystopian literature, students will read texts that function to expound on topics such as surveillance, mob mentality, social equality, government control, and reliance on technology. Students will analyze the various warnings each author presents and seek to understand and evaluate each author's message/prophesy.  The course will engage students through various mediums including short stories poems, novels and films.  An additional goal of the coursework is for students to leave the classroom with not only an increased knowledge of great literature, but also a heightened awareness of the impactful roles they might play in our world. Projects may include students crafting their own dystopian work.

     

    ½ unit of credit

     

    LITERATURE OF NEW YORK- ENGLISH 12 SEMESTER COURSE

    In this class, students will explore a variety of literature and media born in New York City and its boroughs.  After considering the diverse history and culture of the city, the class will focus on both authors who grew up in the city as well as authors whose perspectives of New York are as foreigners. Students will study literature from multiple New York perspectives.  Over the course of the semester, students will study fiction, nonfiction, and media driven by the backdrop of the bustling Big Apple. 

     

    ½ unit of credit

    MYTHS AND LEGENDS–ENGLISH 12 SEMESTER COURSE

    In this class, students will explore the importance of myth and legend as a vehicle for expressing various cultures' histories and values.  The course commences with a study of oral storytelling and the evolution of myth and legend.  The class will then read and discuss creation myths from a variety of word cultures, and even write their own creation myth explaining a particular natural phenomenon or human behavior.  Students will also spend time studying Joseph Campbell's hero journey and use his comparative research (Monomyth ideology) to analyze and understand classic and modern stories as well as films. 

     

    ½ unit of credit

     

    GRAPHIC LITERATURE – ENGLISH 12 SEMESTER COURSE

    This half-year course will focus on alternate modes of storytelling, in both fiction and non-fiction, through the use of short and full-length graphic texts.  This is a course for students with a strong interest in creative storytelling.  Students will learn techniques in both fiction and non-fiction storytelling, using combinations of texts and images, while examining superheroes through a variety of lenses: literary, pop culture, historical, cultural, visual design, and multi-media.  Students will analyze and evaluate professional works and student-centered works, culminating in the development of their own comic book script.

     

    ½ unit of credit

     

    PLAYS AND PLAYWRITING–ENGLISH 12 SEMESTER COURSE

    Students will read a variety of one act and full-length plays, as well as the popular subgenre of 10-minute plays during the semester in order to explore the benefits of this particular genre.  The class will begin with the genre’s origins in ancient Greece and move through its evolution in the present.  The groups will learn to analyze a script and focus on character motivation, intent, and conflict.  Students will be given a chance to perform dramatic reading of the works as well as act out plays.  All of the students’ work will culminate with the students creating and performing their own One Act plays.  Students will explore through text-based analysis, readings, performances, and creative writing.

     

    ½ unit of credit

     

    SHORT STORY – ENGLISH 12 SEMESTER COURSE

    This course will examine the genre of the American short story.  The course will explore its historical origins, the developing versions of written forms, its mode of brevity and compression, and its range of styles: realism, regionalism, modernism, allegory, postmodernism, and more.  Students will analyze what defines a short story and what strategies authors use to reinforce larger themes in a short story collection.  Additionally, we will see how diverse the American experience is represented through the form. Throughout the course, students will primarily read and analyze short stories both independently and in group projects and read excepted theory on the short story form.  Students will also practice writing short stories of their own. 

    ½ unit of credit

     

    THE AMERICAN MYTHOS: BASEBALL – ENGLISH 12 SEMESTER COURSE

    Nothing captures the American imagination quite like baseball, and it is the sport featured most in books, movies, and the American mythos.  While its popularity may have waned as a spectator sport, nothing has dimmed our fascination with it.  What is it about baseball that captures who we are as a country?  Is it that each game could conceivably never end, offering possibility in the direst of circumstances?  Is it that its heroes come from all walks of life, making it a truly egalitarian game?  Is it that it has walked with us through most of our country’s history?  These questions and others will be explored through short stories, novels, movies, and columns.

    ½ unit of credit

    INTRO TO POETRY– ENGLISH 12 SEMESTER COURSE

    This course incorporates the study of poetry with the writing of poetry. We’ll begin with some contemporary writers, to explore rhythm, rhyme, and form–particularly those from several of America’s most celebrated voices. We’ll jump back in time to study poetry from the 19th century, and we’ll ultimately close with a unit on spoken word. Along the way, we’ll study poets ranging from Elizabeth Bishop to Langston Hughes, and we’ll also look closely at two full books by Anne Sexton and John Berryman. Poems will also be paired with music and art. Perhaps most importantly, we’ll grow to become a community of writers that celebrate each other’s poetic voices. 

     

    ½ unit of credit

     

    COLLEGE LIFE AND BEYOND: THE STAGES OF LIFE THROUGH LITERATURE – ENGLISH 12 SEMESTER COURSE

    This course will explore the future through literature, beginning with the stages of life leading to college or employment, then the period of time dedicated to college/first full-time job/military, then independence, then the responsibilities and difficulties of life’s many forks in the road.  Students will begin with topics on the college experience, then onto literature about the real-life thrills, challenges, and questions—professions, parenting, family, fulfillment—that we consider as we grow older, pave our own path, and ponder what it means to get a life.  The course will feature a blend of novels, short stories, current events, poetry, and film.    

     

    ½ unit of credit

    FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES

    The Family and Consumer Sciences (F.A.C.S.) program teaches students information relating to their daily lives.  Courses relate to clothing selection and construction, parenting and child development, nutrition and diet analysis, food preparation, consumerism and career opportunities.

    The Great Neck Board of Education requires that all students complete a ½ credit course in Practical Arts.  Any F.A.C.S. course will meet this graduation requirement.

    In addition, students may arrange for, and are encouraged to partake in independent study courses in every area of F.A.C.S.  The exact program and meeting time will be written according to the curriculum guidelines and agreed upon by both the student and the department chairperson.  An independent study program gives the student the opportunity to explore topics which are of special interest.  It also is an ideal way for students to receive credit for courses which he or she is unable to take because of a lack of time in the student’s busy schedule, or because a course is not being offered.  Nutrition and its relationship to health, and pattern design and construction, are but only two of the programs which can be created.

    FOOD AND NUTRITION COURSES

     

    GOURMET FOODS

    This tasty course will include basic food preparation and skills, as well as advanced cooking techniques.  Some of the delicacies to be prepared and sampled in this hands-on foods course are:  quick breads, appetizers, yeast breads, vegetables, salads, cookies, pies, pastas and soups.  Nutrition, food and diet analysis, food safety and labeling will also be explored.  Students will have the opportunity to prepare meals, which are both satisfying to the palate, as well as nutritionally balanced, in this versatile foods class.

    ½ unit of credit                                                                                  No prerequisite

    INTERNATIONAL FOODS

    International Foods will expose students to some of the diversity of culture and foods of many countries around the world including regions of the United States.  Classroom assignments, cooking demonstrations, guest speakers, and cooking labs will allow students to have a taste of the world.  Students will be involved in research and presentation of a project with a food sample he or she has prepared.

    ½ unit of credit                                                                                  No prerequisite

     

    BAKE SHOP

    Cake decorating, candy making, pie and pastry preparation, cookie and bread baking are only a few of the delicacies to be prepared in class.  Though this hands-on course is primarily involved with preparing confectioneries, other foodstuffs will also be completed.  The class will have input concerning various foods that they would like to pursue.  Lasagna, stir-fry, salads, soups, and vegetables are a sampling of the many choices offered.  Nutrition, food substitutions, and diet analysis will also be discussed during the semester.  After the completion of the course, the student will become a master of creating fine meals to be complimented with delectable desserts.

    ½ unit of credit                                                                                  No prerequisite

    OTHER COURSES 

    CHILD DEVELOPMENT

    This course provides an overview of child development for students who are interested in early childhood and parent education, child psychology, social work, and/or education. Topics will include readiness for parenting, prenatal development, developmental and learning theories, childhood nutrition, play, and methods of parenting. Knowing how children grow and develop, as well as knowing how to care for children are vital skills for anyone to know. A variety of activities and topics are presented including types of development, preschool, learning centers, media influence, the importance of play and reading, and baby care.

    ½ unit of credit                                                                                  No prerequisite

     

    INDEPENDENT LIVING

    Independent Living will help prepare students to be successful members of society by exposing students to a variety of basic skills such as: applying nutrition and wellness knowledge, family basics and parenting, finances and responsible consumer choices, career exploration, cooking, health and safety and much, much more. This course will allow our students the ability to make knowledge-based decisions especially since it has become increasingly important as students learn to navigate the demands of adulthood. Independent Living is designed to prepare students for the realities and responsibilities of managing all aspects of their futures; education, career, interpersonal relationships, civic involvement, and financial security.

     

    ½ unit of credit                                                                                  No prerequisite

     

    FINE AND PERFORMING ARTS

    Within every student lies a creative spirit. Our goal is to nurture the students in ways that promote self-expression and that help them communicate ideas to the world. Our course offerings provide knowledge and training that we hope will enrich their lives forever.

    ART

    It is our belief that an artist develops through exploring Art in an individual creative process over a period of time. In order to encourage continued creative growth on advanced levels, we have created a sequential course of study. These courses must be taken to qualify for the AP Art & Design Program. In the college admission process the art portfolio exemplifies a side of the candidate that a transcript cannot reveal, distinguishing an individual from others with equal qualifications.

    For students interested in building a portfolio of work and completing the AP Art & Design exam, you should consider the following courses: 1.               Studio Art I

    1. Studio Art II
    2. Studio Art III: The Artist’s Vision
    3. Advanced Studio Art
    4. AP Art & Design
    5. In addition to the above, we strongly suggest enrollment in one semester of Sculpture and Ceramics, Digital Design, or Digital Photography.

    STUDIO ART I

    This course fulfills ½ unit towards the 1 unit New York State High School Fine Arts requirement. Throughout the course, students will work with a variety of materials and techniques including drawing, painting, digital art, collage, printmaking, and sculpture to find new ways of giving expression and meaning to ideas. Creative work in the studio and occasional homework assignments will prepare students for Studio Art II.

    1/2 unit of credit; No Prerequisite – Recommended for all students who have not taken any art classes at the high school level.

    STUDIO ART II

    This course fulfills ½ unit towards the 1 unit New York State High School Fine Arts requirement. The curriculum will continue to explore the fundamentals of artistic expression to engage students in visual challenges that improve both technique and imagination, critical thinking skills crucial to success in today’s world. Creative work in the studio and occasional homework assignments will prepare students for Studio Art III and all Art elective courses.

    1/2 unit of credit; Prerequisite: Studio Art I or Art 9

    STUDIO ART III: THE ARTIST’S VISION

    Students will focus studio experience on the creative processes from beginning concepts to finished compositions.

    Specific visual challenges and problem solving will progress to more individual expressive pieces free from traditional boundaries. Creative work in the studio and homework assignments will prepare students for Advanced Art and all Art elective courses.

    ½ unit of credit; Prerequisite: Studio Art II

    SCULPTURE AND CERAMICS

    Students will learn different methods and materials used by sculptors and crafts artists to create three-dimensional works of art that express each student’s individual creative vision. Emphasis on ceramic arts and the use of traditional and non-traditional methods and materials will be explored.

    ½ unit of credit; No prerequisite.

    SCULPTURE AND CERAMICS II

    Students will continue to build on skills and concepts of Sculpture and Ceramics I. Through hands-on projects, advanced sculpture students are challenged to expand their repertoire of methods by exploring new mediums and techniques. Students are also expected to develop their own creative visions with more independent and advanced projects.

    ½ unit of credit; Prerequisite: Sculpture & Ceramics I

    ADVANCED STUDIO ART - Year

    This course is designed for students preparing for AP Art & Design. Complex visual challenges will be presented, and students will pursue a more sophisticated approach to painting and drawing in the creation of personal and meaningful works of art. It is expected that at the end of the year students will have developed a portfolio of quality artwork that may be presented to colleges.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite – Studio Art III

    AP ART & DESIGN - Year

    The Advanced Placement Art & Design course provides high school students with college level art experiences leading to the completion of a portfolio of work for evaluation by the AP examiners. The course is designed for students who have demonstrated maturity and a superior ability to express ideas, concepts, and techniques in two dimensional works of art.

    Students create a portfolio of work to demonstrate inquiry through art and design and development of materials, processes, and ideas over the course of a year. Portfolios include works of art and design, process documentation, and written information about the work presented. In May, students submit portfolios for evaluation based on specific criteria, which include skillful synthesis of materials, processes, and ideas and sustained investigation through practice, experimentation, and revision, guided by questions.

    Students who are highly motivated, who have had successful experiences in previous art courses, and who are willing to devote considerable outside class time to their artwork are good candidates for this course.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite: Advanced Studio Art

    DIGITAL DESIGN

    In this course students will develop an understanding of how to create artwork that expresses each artist’s creative vision through computer design programs (Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator). Students will be challenged to develop their visual and critical thinking skills through computer based art projects; learning how graphic design and digital media has influenced our everyday life in various dimensions.

    ½ unit of credit; No prerequisite.

    Meets computer literacy requirement

    DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

    Digital Photography is an introduction to the use of the digital camera and the electronic darkroom to create photography-based digital art (Adobe Lightroom Classic & Adobe Photoshop). Students develop their photographic eye with a camera through a series of challenges focused on composition and point-of-view. In-class work challenges students to explore the infinite capabilities of digital technology to select, adjust, edit, correct, restore, combine, manipulate, transform and re-present their photographic images.

    ½ unit of credit; Prerequisite: Digital Design, Grades 10-12

    Meets computer literacy requirement

    AP ART HISTORY

    This is an introductory college-level course in art history. Students are expected to engage in a high level of writing, reading, and discussion-based learning. The class surveys painting, sculpture, and architecture from the ancient world to the present with an emphasis on understanding the visual arts as universal human expression. Through critical analysis, students will develop an understanding of the historical and cultural contexts of art. The class will culminate with the taking of the AP Art History Exam in May.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite: Grades 11-12

    FASHION ILLUSTRATION

    Fashion Illustration is an introductory class in design and illustration. Students will learn about the process of design, and the history and relevance of fashion as well as challenges in design inspiration, concept development, fashion illustration, and fashion digital studio - students will take part in each stage of the fashion design process.

    ½ unit of credit; Prerequisite: Grades 10-12 and Studio Art I or Art 9

    ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING

    This Course includes the study of house and building planning, design, and construction. Students will design and develop floor and elevation plans. Projects may also include section/plot plans or scale models. The class will begin with traditional hand drafting and progress to working in a digital format.

    ½ unit of credit; Prerequisite: Grades 10-12

    Meets computer literacy requirement.

    STAGECRAFT

    There is more to putting on a play than just acting. Find out what goes on behind the scenes. We will examine different styles of set design and construction, using a variety of tools, painting techniques and special stage effects. We will also look at lighting for the stage and the various roles of the backstage crews. This is a fun course for anyone interested in theater from a different point of view.

    NOTE: This class is offered on a flexible schedule basis

    ½ unit of credit; No prerequisite. Meets ½ credit of Art/Music/Drama or Practical Arts requirement.

    FILM AND VIDEO - Semester Course

    In this course, students will balance watching and learning about the history of film and influential filmmakers, while learning about storytelling, composition and editing techniques to produce creative personal video projects (using Adobe Premiere). The wide selection of films viewed illustrate various techniques and examine the art of filmmaking in order to give the student a deeper appreciation for the cultural and aesthetic impacts that film has in our society, and how they can contribute to it.

    ½ unit of credit; Prerequisite: Grades 10-12

    Meets computer literacy requirement.

    Meets   requirement of ½ credit Art/Music/Drama or computer literacy.

    FILM AND VIDEO II: THE SEQUEL - Semester Course

    In this course, students will continue watching and learning about the history of film through the lens of influential filmmakers (“auteurs”) that have broken new ground in storytelling and techniques. In this class, there will be more of an emphasis on individual creative video projects that will allow students to pursue their own interest in genre and subject matter.

    ½ unit of credit; Prerequisite: Film And Video I.

    Meets requirement of ½ credit of Art/Music/Drama or computer literacy

    Drama Courses  

    INTRODUCTION TO PERFORMANCE

    This class will introduce and illustrate the fundamentals of acting by actively participating in physical, vocal, and mental exercises. The course will provide a foundation of general acting vocabulary, basic techniques for physical and vocal expression and develop the actor’s imagination as it relates to storytelling and communication skills. At this level, the intent is to provide opportunities for the student to discover the transferable skills learned while acting. These skills can be applied to any vocation. The students will learn these skills by performing individually and in small groups in front of their peers. Some of these skills include trust, creativity, collaboration, observation, focus, listening, and responding. While an introductory course, all learners have the capability to become a confident actor through commitment, hard work, and being open to constructive criticism.                                   

    ½ unit of credit                                                                  No prerequisite

    Semester course                                                Meets requirement of Art/Drama/Music credit 

     

    ADVANCED THEATRE  

    This course is designed to allow the student to develop performance skills, as well as learn about various styles of theatre. Scene work /monologues, Improv, theatre games, directing, and playwriting will all be explored. Throughout the year there will be performance opportunities outside of class including an end of year performance.

    1 unit of credit                                                                   Prerequisites: any theatre course that was   previously completed or   participation in the middle school drama.

                                                                                              Meets requirement of Art/Drama/Music credit                                                                                                

    PUBLIC SPEAKING I

    The objective of this course is to learn and practice effective delivery of speeches for a variety of purposes and audiences. Students will engage in activities focusing on their voice, body language, and speech preparation and perform the following types of speeches: introductory, informative, demonstration, persuasive, and special occasions. You will be expected to participate in class as speaker and as an audience member. 

    1/2 unit of credit                                                               No prerequisites

    Semester course                                                    Meets requirement of Art/Drama/Music credit

     

    PUBLIC SPEAKING II

    Building upon PUBLIC SPEAKING I, this course will focus on honing and cementing students' abilities to deliver impactful speeches through a combination of theoretical learning, practical exercises, and presentation opportunities.  Students will develop their confidence, stage presence, and delivery skills with emphasis placed on advanced public speaking techniques such as delivering persuasive speeches, impromptu speaking, debate, poetry, dramatic storytelling, radio & podcast, and engaging with different audiences. Students will continue to build foundational best practices with visual aids, vocal variety, body language, and effective storytelling techniques to captivate and motivate their audience.

     

    1/2 unit of credit                                                                  Prerequisite: Public Speaking I

    Semester course                                                       Meets requirement of Art/Drama/Music credit

     

    MUSIC

    The study of Music at North High includes many course offerings and performance opportunities! Students are encouraged to explore their interests through performance, music theory, and classes that provide creative opportunities. If you have any questions, please email Dr. Pamela Levy, Department Head of Fine and Performing Arts.

     PLevy-Majnemer@greatneck.k12.ny.us

     

     

    CONCERT CHOIR – FULL YEAR  

    CONCERT CHOIR is a large ensemble for students in grades 9, 10, 11 and 12 who love to sing!  No audition is required. The ensemble works on repertoire of all types with a strong emphasis on learning to read music. NYSSMA preparation is included in the course, which can lead to being selected for the prestigious All County and All State festivals. Attendance at all concert performance dates is required to receive credit. Students will perform at the Winter, Valentine Pops, and Spring Artfest concerts, as well as community events and other performances. This class meets every day. 

     

    1 unit of credit                                                                                   Open to all students grades 9-12

    No prerequisite 

    Meets Art/Drama/Music requirement. 

     

    CHAMBER CHOIR- AM FULL YEAR

    This course is for the student in grades 9, 10, 11, and 12 who loves to sing and enjoys a challenging musical experience. No audition is required. NYSSMA preparation is included in the course, which lead to being selected for the prestigious All County and All State festivals. Musicianship skills are emphasized such as sight-reading and conducting. Music will be studied from the Renaissance to the 21st Century such as Monteverdi, Bach, Brahms, Mozart, Poulenc, and Rutter.  Students will perform at the Winter and Spring Artfest concerts, as well as community events and other performances. 

     

     

    1 unit of credit.                                                                                 Open to all students grades 9-12

    No prerequisite 

    Meets Art/Drama/Music requirement. 

     

    SONGWRITING

    Do you have ideas for creating songs and would like to understand how to write them down? This course will introduce the art and craft of songwriting through the study of harmony, melody, lyrics, rhythm, tempo, key, texture, and structure. In addition, the course will cover elements of  music production and marketing. There will be a showcase at the end of the semester. 

     

    1/2 unit of credit                                                                              Open to all students grades 9-12 

    Semester course                                                               No prerequisite

                                                                                                                    Meets computer literacy requirement   

     

     

                                                                           

    ADVANCED PIANO- 1/2 Year

    This course will provide instruction and opportunities to perform for students who have already had several years of studying piano.  Students will study composers by the masters; Chopin, Beethoven, Bach, Debussy, and others. There will be at least one recital during the term.                                                                  

    1/2 unit of credit                                                                              Open to all students grades 9-12

    Semester course                                                                              No prerequisite

    Meets Art/Drama/Music requirement                                        

                   

    VOICE

    Would you like to learn how to sing, or to improve your voice? VOICE is class that meets every day and is open to all students.  No audition or prerequisite is required.  The purpose of the course is to help you realize your talent by studying different styles such as musical theatre, pop, rock, jazz, opera, and art song.  The class will consist of vocal technique, sight reading, preparation for concerts, competitions, and college auditions.  In addition, students will have the opportunity to perform at community events.

    1/2 unit of credit                                                                              Open to All Students grade 9-12 

    Semester course                                                                              No prerequisite

                                                                                                                    Meets Art/Drama/Music requirement

     

    MUSIC TODAY

    Do you love to listen to music?! This course is designed for those students who do not participate in a major performing ensemble, but who enjoy learning about music!  Students will develop skills in critical listening, as they will discuss different styles of music.  A rich history of contemporary music and other forms is a primary focus, along with discussion and analysis of current pop music and industry trends. 

     

    1/2 unit of credit                                                                              Open to All Students grade 9-12 

    Semester course                                                                              No prerequisite

                                                                                                                    Meets Art/Drama/Music requirement

                                                                                       

    MUSIC THEORY and TECHNOLOGY I (SEMESTER)

    This course is an introduction to learning the elements of music; notes, rhythms, time signatures, chords, melody, harmony, and other topics. As students master the material they will learn to score music through using a computer program (Noteflight) which will enable them to produce original compositions. This course is a prerequisite for AP Music Theory.

                                                                                       

    1/2 unit of credit                                                                              Open to All Students grade 9-12 

    Semester course                                                                              No prerequisite

                                                                                                                    Meets Art/Drama/Music requirement

                                                                                                         Meets computer literacy requirement

    AP MUSIC THEORY

    This course is for the student interested in the advanced study of music. Having experience playing an instrument or being in chorus for several years is optimal. This course will include the study of four part writing, analysis, and musical style, along with practice in ear training, sight singing, and musicianship.  The AP test is required for completion of the course.

     

    1 unit of credit                                                                                   Prerequisite:  Foundational study in      Music Theory, Music Theory and Technology, an  interview with the instructor.

                                                                                                            Meets Music/Art/Drama requirement

     

    CONCERT BAND – FULL YEAR 

    Enrollment in CONCERT BAND is available to all woodwind, brass and percussion students in grades 9, 10, 11 and 12. Students remain in Concert Band for as many terms until they qualify for Symphony Band. All members of the CONCERT BAND are encouraged to participate in additional music opportunities such as chamber music, pep band, jazz ensemble, musical pit orchestra, and to prepare solo compositions for the NYSSMA Solo Evaluation Festival, which can lead to being selected for the prestigious All County and All State performing ensembles.

     

    1 unit of credit                                                                                       Prerequisites:  Participation in the 8th     grade Band Recommendation from a music teacher

                                                                                                                Meets Music/Art/Drama requirement

                                                                                                                                                   

    SYMPHONY BAND – FULL YEAR 

    Enrollment in the SYMPHONY BAND is available to all woodwind, brass and percussion students in grades 10, 11 and 12 who have successfully completed CONCERT BAND requirements. Students remain in the Symphonic Band subject to satisfactory performance. All members of the SYMPHONY BAND are encouraged to participate in additional music opportunities such as chamber music, pep band, jazz ensemble, musical pit orchestra, and to prepare solo compositions for the NYSSMA Solo evaluation Festival, which can lead to being selected for the prestigious All County and All State performing ensembles and/or All Eastern select ensembles.

     

     

    1 unit of credit                                                                                   Prerequisites:  Participation for at least 2 semesters in the CONCERT BAND

    Recommendation from the BAND  director

                                                                                                           Meets Music/Art/Drama requirement

     

                                                                                                                                                                   

    CONCERT ORCHESTRA – FULL YEAR
    Enrollment in CONCERT ORCHESTRA is available to all ninth grade string players. Students remain in Concert orchestra for as many terms as necessary until they qualify for SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, subject to a satisfactory performance. The course is designed for ninth grade string students as well as for 10th, 11th, and 12th graders who need foundational instruction in string techniques. Membership in the CONCERT ORCHESTRA entails mandatory attendance at all scheduled performances. In addition, students in the Concert Orchestra are encouraged to participate in the Jazz Orchestra, Pit Orchestra, and to prepare solo compositions for the NYSSMA Solo Evaluation festival, which can lead to being selected for the prestigious All County and All State performing ensembles.

    .

     

    1 unit of credit                                                                                                                              Prerequisites:  Participation in the 8th grade ORCHESTRA

                                                                                                              Recommendation from a music teacher

                                                                                       Meets Music/Art/Drama requirement

     

     

    SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA – FULL YEAR
    Enrollment in the Symphony Orchestra is available to all string players who have successfully completed the CONCERT ORCHESTRA Class requirements. Wind and percussion players should not register for Symphony Orchestra. Students remain in the SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA subject to satisfactory performance. Challenging works of the string orchestra repertoire (NYSSMA ratings IV-VI) are studied and performed. Membership in the Symphony Orchestra requires mandatory attendance at all scheduled performances. Members of the SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA are encouraged to register for the CHAMBER MUSIC class, audition for the Jazz Orchestra, and Pit Orchestras. They also have the opportunity to prepare solo compositions to participate in the NYSSMA Solo Evaluation Festival, which can lead to being selected for the prestigious All County and All State performing ensembles.

    1 unit of credit

    Prerequisites:  Participation for at least 2 semesters in the     CONCERT ORCHESTRA

    Recommendation from the ORCHESTRA director

                                                                                                Meets Music/Art/Drama requirement

     

     

    CHAMBER MUSIC (A.M.)

    Enrollment in CHAMBER MUSIC is available to all students who play string, woodwind, brass, percussion, and keyboard instruments. The class meets every school day from 7:15-7:57 am. The course is designed for student musicians already registered for on of the core Instrumental classes (SYMPHONY BAND, SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, CONCERT ORCHESTRA, or CONCERT BAND, who wish to develop instrumental techniques necessary to perform in a chamber ensemble. 

     

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisites:  Enrollment in CONCERT   BAND, SYMPHONY BAND, CONCERT ORCHESTRA, OR

    SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA and/or approval by the department chair.                                                           

     

    Meets Music/Art/Drama requirement

    HEALTH EDUCATION

    Health Education is a multi-faceted curriculum for our students who are confronted with a myriad of complex and perplexing health problems, decisions, and responsibilities and who must be able to solve problems and meet responsibilities during an era marked by rapid scientific and technological advances as well as changing social conditions.  We hope this curriculum will enhance the awareness of students physically, socially, and psychologically so they may learn to cope with daily living.  Thus, we can help them make sound value judgments about how to live in today’s as well as tomorrow’s society.

    HEALTH 9 - Semester Course for Freshman

    This comprehensive health course is designed to meet the specific needs of the ninth grade student.  We know that the high school years are dynamic ones, which expose students to many new experiences that require major personal decisions.  Health 9 responds to the ninth grader’s unique needs by offering a mandated program that will help them create a healthier, more successful high school experience through prevention.  Our focus is to develop critical thinking, decision making, coping and assertiveness skills in an open, student oriented setting.

    ½ unit of credit                                                                                  No prerequisite.

    HEALTH 9 - Offered on alternate days for the year

    See above description.

    ½ unit of credit                                                                                  No prerequisite.

    HEALTH 11 - Semester Course for Juniors

    This course builds on the functional and skill- based knowledge introduced in Health 9, focusing on physical emotional, social, and intellectual issues faced by an older adolescent as they complete their last years of high school and move on to higher education, the job market, and a more independent lifestyle.  Students will utilize reliable resources and statistics to identify root causes for current health trends, and develop proactive strategies for maintaining and incorporating health and wellness into their lifestyles.  This course satisfies the New York State requirement for graduation

    ½ unit of credit                                                                                  No prerequisite.

    HEALTH 11 - Semester Course for Seniors

    This course is designed for seniors who have not taken health in their junior year.

    ½ unit of credit                                                                                  No prerequisite

    HEALTH PEER LEADERSHIP

    Peer Leadership is a program in which select upperclassmen serve as mentors to 9th graders and the entire school community.  Health Peer Leadership blends the content of Health 11 with the development of leadership skills, all within the framework of the New York State Health curriculum.  Students selected to participate in the program will examine what makes an effective leader and learn how to develop techniques and strategies to improve their leadership skills.  Students will utilize these skills during 9th grade advisory sessions as they lead discussions each Wednesday morning during the fall semester.

    ½ unit of credit                                                                                  Prerequisite: Application, possible interview

                                                                                                                    And selection by committee

    Library Media Center

    At the Great Neck North High School Library, we redefine the traditional library experience. It's not just a place for books; it's a vibrant hub where academic support and creative exploration converge. Our team of dedicated librarians offer personalized assistance, guiding students through every stage of their academic journey. From in-depth research to the final touches on assignments, we ensure every student navigates their responsibilities with confidence and success.

    Academic Empowerment:

    At North High's Library, we represent a powerhouse of learning resources. Our collections are vast and varied, featuring an extensive array of print and digital books that span from classic literature to the latest scientific publications. However, our resources extend beyond just books. We provide access to a wide range of scholarly journals and comprehensive online databases, making it easier for students to engage in deep and diverse research. Our digital resources are constantly updated, ensuring that students have access to the most current information and tools.

    The library’s environment is designed to cater to different learning styles and needs. Quiet zones offer a sanctuary for students who need a distraction-free space for deep concentration. For those who thrive in collaborative settings, we have group study areas that encourage discussion and idea sharing.

    Furthermore, the heart and soul of North High's Library are our librarians and library staff. Far more than caretakers of our book collections, they are the architects of academic success and invaluable allies in the educational journey of every student. With their extensive knowledge in research methodologies and a deep understanding of the vast array of resources available, they play a crucial role in guiding students through the complex landscape of information. Always approachable and eager to assist, they offer personalized research advice, help in navigating digital and print resources, and provide tailored support in utilizing these academic tools effectively. Their commitment to fostering a supportive and resource-rich environment is instrumental in helping students not just find information, but also in developing the critical skills needed to analyze and use it effectively, preparing them for a lifetime of learning and discovery.

    Collaboration:

    Our role extends beyond being a standalone resource; we actively collaborate with teachers and classes to enrich the educational landscape of our school. This partnership is rooted in the shared goal of enhancing student learning and engagement.

    Our librarians work closely with teachers to develop tailored resources and materials that complement the curriculum. Whether it's curating book lists for specific subjects, providing access to specialized databases for research projects, or organizing thematic displays in line with current classroom topics, we ensure that our library's resources are aligned with and responsive to classroom needs.

    We also host class visits to the library, where students can engage in guided research sessions, learn information literacy skills, and participate in interactive workshops that reinforce classroom learning. These sessions are customized to the unique requirements of each class and subject, providing hands-on experiences that deepen students' understanding and interest in various topics.

    The Library is a dynamic collaborative space, bridging the gap between classroom learning and library resources. We are committed to working hand-in-hand with teachers to create an integrated learning environment that supports, challenges, and inspires our students.

    Creative Exploration:

    At North High's Library, we believe in nurturing the creative spirit of every student. Our library is not just a haven for academic pursuit but a vibrant center for artistic and technological exploration. Whether they're designing stunning visuals using tools like Cricut, experimenting with sound on professional DJ equipment, bringing ideas to life with our 3D printers, or stepping into the role of a filmmaker in our fully-equipped TV studio, students can unleash their creativity in our Makerspace.

    Our library is a dynamic space where students can explore and develop their artistic abilities, learn new skills, and express themselves in myriad ways. We are dedicated to providing an environment where the imagination is encouraged to soar, and creative boundaries are pushed, enabling our students to become not just consumers of content, but creators and innovators in their own right.

    Beyond Academics:

    At North High's Library, we recognize that education extends beyond academic achievement and includes personal growth and well-being. Our library serves as a sanctuary for relaxation and intellectual enrichment beyond the confines of a traditional classroom. We offer a selection of mind-stimulating puzzles and games, which provide not only a break from the rigors of academic study but also an opportunity to develop critical thinking, strategic planning, and problem-solving skills in a fun and engaging way. In addition, our arts and crafts stations allow students to express themselves artistically and explore their imaginative potentials. The blend of intellectual and creative activities creates a dynamic and interactive environment, where learning is not just academic but also playful and exploratory, fostering a well-rounded educational experience.

    Great Neck North High's Library is more than a resource center; it's a dynamic space that nurtures the whole student. It is a place where relaxation, personal growth, enrichment, and community engagement all come together, making it an integral part of the students’ educational journey.

     

    MATHEMATICS

    The courses offered in the Mathematics Department are designed to give you the necessary experience to prepare for college entrance or entry to the world of work.  Three units of mathematics are required for graduation; all courses are applicable toward this requirement.  A three-year sequence may be satisfied by any three units of credit earned in this department.

    All courses will introduce students to analysis of functions graphically, numerically, algebraically, and verbally and incorporate appropriate use of technology.  Those students in Pre-Calculus or Pre-Calculus Honors may be recommended for AP Statistics, AP Calculus AB or AP Calculus BC.

    NINTH GRADE COURSES

     

    PRE-ALGEBRA 1 CC

    This course is designed to give students a solid foundation in the mathematical concepts needed to prepare them for Algebra 1. Students' arithmetic competence is extended to working with algebraic expressions and solving equations.

     

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Teacher recommendation

     

    ALGEBRA 1 CC

    This course, which is the first in the NYS three-year sequence for Mathematics, has algebra as its focal point but includes a strong problem solving component.  Data analysis is included.  Common Core exam required.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Math 8

     

    ALGEBRA 1 CC LAB

    Students recommended by their Math 8 teachers as needing additional instruction to master the concepts and skills of Algebra 1 will take this course concurrently with their Algebra 1 course.  This class meets on alternate days.

    Prerequisite:  Math 8 and teacher recommendation

     

    TENTH GRADE COURSES

    GEOMETRY CC

    This second course in the New York State three-year sequence for Mathematics will introduce students to the study of geometric relationships.  Reasoning and proof will be used formally and informally to illustrate concepts and solve problems.  Common Core exam required.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Completion of Algebra and teacher recommendation

    GEOMETRY CC LAB

    Students recommended by their Algebra 1 teacher as needing additional instruction to master the concepts of geometric relationships. The students take this course concurrently with their Geometry course.  The class meets on alternate days.

    Prerequisite:  Completion of Algebra 1 and teacher recommendation

     

    GEOMETRY CC HONORS

    This course is designed for students whose performance in Algebra has been consistently above average and who possess keen mathematical insight.  The Geometry content from the New York State syllabus will be covered in depth and with enrichment.  Common Core exam required.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Completion of Algebra 1 with a minimum course grade of 90, a minimum of 90 on Algebra

    Common Core exam and teacher recommendation.

    ALGEBRA/GEOMETRY CONNECTIONS

    Students recommended by their Algebra 1 teacher as needing additional instruction to fine tune their understanding of Algebra and apply this knowledge to understand the concepts of Geometry will take this course.  This course meets once a day.   There is no Regents exam at the end of this course.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite: Completion of  Algebra 1 and teacher recommendation

    ELEVENTH GRADE COURSES

    ALGEBRA 2 CC

    This course is the third of the math courses required for the NYS Regents Diploma.  The course includes advanced algebra topics, higher order analysis of functions, probability and statistics.  The Algebra Common Core Regents exam is required. 

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Completion of Algebra 1 and Geometry and teacher recommendation

     

    ALGEBRA 2 CC with LAB

    Students recommended by their Geometry teachers as needing additional instruction to master the concepts of Algebra2/ Trigonometry will take this course which includes an extra period of Math on alternate days.  Regents exam is required.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Completion of Algebra 1 and Geometry and teacher recommendation.

     

    ALGEBRA 2 CC HONORS

    This course will contain the third segment in a three year sequence as described by New York State.  The accelerated pace of this course will be appropriate for only the most serious and mature mathematics students.  Regents exam is required.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Completion of Algebra 1 and Geometry Honors with a grade of 90 or above in each course

    and in each Regents with teacher recommendation. 

    ALGEBRA 2.1

    This course is the first year of a two year curriculum that examines advanced algebra topics and analysis of various functions.  Students who take this course will take the Algebra 2 CC exam in the second year of this course.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Completion of Algebra/Geometry Connections or Geometry CC and teacher

    recommendation 

     

    PRE-CALCULUS HONORS

    This course is intended for the student who plans to continue his/her study with AP Calculus in the future.  Students who demonstrate a mastery of the topics in algebra and trigonometry should consider this course.  Evidence of this mastery would be indicated by

    1. A final average of “A” along with a Regents exam grade of at least 90 in Algebra 2 / Trigonometry.
    2. Teacher recommendation.

    Throughout the course the graphing of functions and relations will be emphasized since the mastery of these skills are essential to the calculus.  Among the topics to be studied are:  functions - absolute value, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, and multi-defined -conic sections, polar coordinates, sequences and series, limits and continuity, derivatives and applications of derivatives. 

    The student should be able to extract application techniques from the concepts taught with minimal guidance from the teacher.  Students will be expected to have a mastery of basic and intermediate textbook problems.   Students should anticipate a higher level of challenge in the Pre-Calculus Honors class than in a Pre-Calculus class.

    The student will take a departmental final in June.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Grade of 90 or better in Algebra 2 CC honors and teacher recommendation.

    TWELFTH GRADE COURSES

    ALGEBRA 2.2

    This course is the second year of a two year curriculum that examines advanced algebra topics and analysis of various functions.  Students who take this course will take the Algebra 2 CC exam at the end of January and will continue with topics of mathematics that will better prepare them for college mathematics.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra 2.1 and teacher recommendation

    COLLEGE MATH

    This course has a dual purpose.  It will emphasize those topics that typically are required for a first year

    college algebra course while it uses problem solving skills that are applicable for basic business practices including interest problems for credit cards, loans and mortgages, making decisions based on statistical data and mathematical modeling. 

     

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation 

     

    STATISTICS MODELS THE WORLD

    Emphasis in this course will be on interpretation of statistics in multiple settings including behavioral sciences, medicine, economics, education, and politics.  The graphing calculator will be used extensively in all applications.  Concepts to be covered include exploratory data analysis, data collection, probability, and inference.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite: Algebra 2 CC with a final average of 75 or better and teacher recommendation

     

    PRE-CALCULUS

    A course intended to prepare students for further who plan to take Calculus or college math next year. 

    Topics studied will include but not be limited to:  function theory, analytic geometry, curve sketching, limits, continuity and differentiation of algebraic functions.  The use of a graphing calculator as a problem-solving tool will be explored.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Passing grade in Algebra 2 CC, and teacher recommendation

    CALCULUS HONORS

    This course will include the study of functions, techniques of graphing, limits and continuity, the derivative and it applications, techniques and applications of integration.  The emphasis of this course will be on real-world uses of the calculus, with less emphasis on theoretical development than in the advanced placement courses.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Completion of Pre-Calculus and teacher recommendation

     

    ADVANCED PLACEMENT MATHEMATICS - CALCULUS AB

    This college level course is intended for those students who:

    1)            Have grade of "A" or "B" in the honors or accelerated sequence.

    2)            Exhibit a keen insight in mathematics.

    3)            Have a thorough knowledge of college preparatory mathematics including algebra, axiomatic geometry, trigonometry and analytic geometry.

    It is the Department's strong feeling that both intuition and rigor are essential to a proper understanding of mathematics.

    The topics covered will include, but are not limited to:  Differential Calculus which includes derivatives of polynomial, trigonometry, and logarithmic functions, applications of the derivative such as slope of a curve, curve sketching, velocity and acceleration;  Integral Calculus which involves antiderivatives, integration by substitution; the definite integral as a concept of an area, volume, average value of a function, approximating using rectangles or trapezoids, limit of a sum and the fundamental theorem of Calculus.

    Students are required to take the Advanced Placement exam in May.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite: Successful completion of Pre-Calculus Honors or Pre-Calculus with Department

    recommendation

     

    Those not receiving the department recommendation will be required to meet with counselor, department head, and parents to ensure full awareness of the high level of commitment and skill required to succeed in AP Calculus AB.

     

    ADVANCED PLACEMENT MATHEMATICS - CALCULUS BC

    The BC Advanced Placement Calculus course is the most rigorous course in the AP Math curriculum.  This is a college level course to be chosen by students with:

    1)            Grades of "A" in the honor sequence.

    2)            A thorough knowledge of algebra, geometry, trigonometry, elementary functions and analytic geometry.

    3)            The ability to comprehend new mathematical techniques and concepts on a daily basis.

    4)            The ability to work clearly and accurately with problems that are multi-faceted.

    5)            The ability to discuss math problems, along with solutions provided by fellow students; the time, energy and commitment to devote to a demanding, in depth, intellectually challenging course.

    All of the topics in Calculus AB are covered.  In addition, sequences and series, vector functions, polar functions, arc length, improper integrals, greater depth in limits, integration and other topics.  The College Board description generalizes:  Calculus AB is given a full year's college credit and Calculus BC is designed for placement one college semester beyond that.

    Students are required to take the Advanced Placement exam in May.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Pre-Calculus Honors or AB Calculus with Department

    recommendation

                                    Those not receiving the department recommendation will be required to meet with counselor, department head, and parents to ensure full awareness of the high level of commitment and skill required to succeed in AP Calculus BC.

     

    ADVANCED PLACEMENT MATHEMATICS – STATISTICS

    This college level course is intended for those students who:

    1. Have completed Algebra 2 Honors or Pre-Calculus with minimum grade of 90 and have the recommendation of their teacher or have completed Algebra 2 with a minimum grade of 95 with both teacher and department chairperson recommendation.
    2. Exhibit mathematical insight

    The topics for AP Statistics are divided into four major themes:  exploratory analysis, planning a study, probability, and statistical inference.  This course adheres to the philosophy and methods of modern data analysis; use of computers and graphing calculators is essential.

    Important components of the course in addition to lecture and reading of the textbook will include use of technology, projects and laboratories, cooperative group problem solving, and writing as a part of concept-oriented instruction and assessment.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Algebra 2 Honors or Pre-Calculus with a minimum grade of 90 with teacher

    recommendation or Algebra 2 with a minimum grade of 95 with both teacher and Department Chairperson  

    recommendation.

    Those not receiving the department recommendation will be required to meet with counselor, department head, and parents to ensure full awareness of the high level of commitment and skill required to succeed in AP Statistics.

     

    ADVANCED TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS

    This course is a half-year elective in math, with the option of taking the course in both semesters.  Topics covered in the first semester will not be repeated in the second.  The topics introduced will be independent of the Pre-Calculus/Calculus curriculums and will not require prerequisite knowledge from those courses.

    This course is designed for advanced students who wish to examine some non-traditional high school math topics including linear algebra, number theory, mathematical induction, number systems, non-Euclidean geometry, graph theory and combinatorics.

    ½ unit of credit each semester; Prerequisite:  Completion of Pre-Calculus or Pre-Calculus Honors. Teacher

    recommendation required. 

    The courses offered in the Mathematics Department are designed to give you the necessary experience to prepare for college entrance or entry to the world of work.  Three units of mathematics are required for graduation; all courses are applicable toward this requirement.  A three-year sequence may be satisfied by any three units of credit earned in this department.

    All courses will introduce students to analysis of functions graphically, numerically, algebraically, and verbally and incorporate appropriate use of technology.  Those students in Pre-Calculus or Pre-Calculus Honors may be recommended for AP Statistics, AP Calculus AB or AP Calculus BC.

    ROBOTICS 1

    This course will introduce students to the field of robotics and curriculum will focus on electronic, mathematical, and physics-based concepts.  Programming and building robots require the use of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) applications.  Students will also learn fundamental programming concepts and scientific method and inquiry techniques.  The robotics industry will be explored and students may have the opportunity to participate in robotics competitions.

    ½ unit of credit; Prerequisite: None but Priority given to 11th  & 12th graders

     

    ROBOTICS 2

    This course will provide an in-depth study of the field of robotics and the curriculum will focus on electronic, mathematical, and physics-based concepts.  Programming and building robots requires the use of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) applications.  Student will also learn fundamental programming concepts and scientific method and inquiry techniques.  The robotics industry will be explored and students may have the opportunity to participate in robotics competitions.

    ½ unit of credit; Prerequisite: Successful completion of Robotics 1

     

    PHYSICAL EDUCATION

     

    All students are required to take and pass 8 consecutive semesters of Physical Education in order to graduate from Great Neck North H.S.   Students who have medical excuses from Physical Education are assigned to regular Physical Education classes, and activities will be adapted according to the recommendation of the physician, school nurse and Physical Education department.   According to law, all students must report to physical education when they are scheduled to do so, regardless of the medical problem. 

    9th Grade Curriculum

    This curriculum focuses on all areas of physical education including team sports, weight training, cooperative games, net sports, fitness and ethics in sports.  All 9th grade students are required to take this curriculum during their first year at NHS.  This is a separate curriculum exclusively for our 9th grade students.

    10th – 12th Grade Curriculum

    Students in the upper grades are given greater options in their physical education program.  In classes with multiple teachers, and/or in team taught classes, each student will be given an opportunity to choose what type of activity they will be taking for each quarter.  Choices in 10-12 grades include:

    1. Team Sports - Football, Basketball, Hand Ball, Broom Hockey, Ultimate Frisbee, Softball and Volleyball.
    2. Net Sports - Badminton, Pickle ball, Volleyball
    3. Dance - Salsa, Hip Hop, Modern, Latin, Jazz.  Students will choreograph and design dance routines.
    4. Life Fitness Activities - Cardio Fitness, Strength Training, Yoga, Pilates, Core Strength Training, and Interval Training.
    5. Cooperative Games and Project Adventure

    Morning FitnessThis class is open to all 10th-12th grade students who participate in our athletics program.  It meets from 6:55-7:45, two times per week in the small gym at North High School.  This is a weight training class specifically geared towards improving athletic performance.

     

    INTRAMURALS - SPORT TEAMS

    Students are invited to participate in our extensive athletic program as a member of either an intramural or interscholastic team.

    Boys and girls who are interested in intramurals which are held each day between 3 p.m. and 4 p.m. should consult with their physical education teacher.  In most sports there are also opportunities to try out for positions on the varsity interscholastic teams.  Girls may compete on boy's teams as authorized by the Commissioner of Education.  A listing of our typical sports offerings is located on the Athletics homepage.

    SCIENCE

    Introduction:

     

    New York State has adopted the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), referred to as the New York State Science Learning Standards (NYSSLS).  The adoption of these new standards has not changed what we teach but how we teach.  Today’s science classes look very different from science classes historically.  While teacher directed instruction is still critical, students will be expected to participate in hands-on, discovery-based learning that will require them to work through unfamiliar scenarios, ask questions, construct explanations, plan and carry out investigations, collect data, make claims supported by evidence, engage in scientific argumentation, model complex systems, identify patterns, determine cause and effect, and describe phenomena.  Students will be responsible for their learning.  Teachers are responsible for setting up the environment that will allow them to learn successfully.  Our most important job is to switch from teaching students to learn what scientists know and move toward teaching students to do what scientists do.  This is the most common request from science professionals and professors!

     

    Failure is part of the NGSS; not failure in terms of grades, though this may occur, but more importantly, the willingness to try something that may or may not work, analyze the results and try again.  Students and parents are extremely uncomfortable with this.  Your support in encouraging our young people to try without an initial guarantee of success is paramount to creating an atmosphere for REAL science learning.

     

    Student Course Placement:

    Students are placed into science courses each year based upon a number of factors; the ultimate placement is a result of their science teacher’s recommendation.  Grades in the child’s current science courses are certainly considered, as they have consistently been shown to be a good indicator of success.  Grades in other relevant courses, especially math, are also considered. Grades are not the only indicator of success; student behaviors like note taking, attending extra help, and appropriate engagement in the classroom and laboratory setting, willingness to try new things, and to struggle with challenging topics also contribute to the teacher’s recommendation for courses.  Please contact your child’s teacher if you wish to discuss your child’s recommendation.

    Self Select: Junior and Seniors students who are not recommended to take an Advanced Placement (AP) course are permitted to self select into one course total per year.  Should you and your child decide to take this route, your child must:

    1. Obtain a form from the guidance counselor that you, your child, your child’s counselor, and the science department head will sign.
    2. Meet with the department chair to discuss the choice
    3. Submit a completed self select form to guidance

    *** Please be aware that any student who needs to change courses after the beginning of the year may be required to change their schedule, often significantly; this can include both a change in periods and a change in teacher(s).  This possibility should be weighed in the decision to self select into any course.  Due to limits on class size, a student dropping from an AP Course is not guaranteed a placement in an Honors course.

     

    Meetings Per Cycle:

    • All science laboratory classes in Physics, Chemistry, and Biology meet every day for one period and have an additional laboratory period every other day.  For example, your child may meet every day period 3 for science and every other day period 4 for laboratory.
    • Science Electives meet 1 period/day.

    NINTH GRADE

    Physics 9:

     

    Who Should Take Physics 9?

     

    Almost all ninth grade students are expected to enroll in Physics 9. Exceptions are those students who are recommended by North Middle School to enroll in Physics Regents or AP Physics 1.

     

    What Will We Be Studying In Physics 9?

     

    Physics 9 will follow an algebra-based physics curriculum appropriate for high school freshmen.  This course covers many of the traditional areas of a first course in Physics, with sections on: motion, forces, momentum and impulse, energy, and electricity.  Alongside the theoretical section of the course, there will be a strong practical aspect as well.  Experimentation is a major part of the subject and will occur throughout the course.  There is also an emphasis on improving number sense, a skill that is critical to success in all science classes.

     

    What Will Be Expected Of Me?

     

    Students will be expected to engage in a variety of learning experiences.  Teacher directed instruction, engineering challenges, creation and execution of laboratory activities, various levels of group work, and discovery based learning are the norm.  The course is investigative in nature and students are often expected to work in groups to create a single product.  Students will also be expected to take notes and participate in class discussions.  Students are required to have a non-graphing scientific calculator, a ruler, and a protractor with them every day in addition to a fully charged iPad and other required materials. Students should expect to study and practice outside of class every day and to attend extra help if they are struggling. 

     

    How Is The Course Taught?

     

    A variety of methods will be employed, including direct instruction, the use of demonstrations, model making, videos, graphical analysis, investigations, and a great deal of hands-on laboratory and group work.  Students will also participate in flipped classroom activities which move the introduction of the content to structured videos, watched outside of class, leaving room for hands-on problem solving with the teacher in class.  Students will also be required to complete a quarterly engineering project.

     

    What Are The Completion Requirements?

     

    Students will be required to take the school-based exit exam in June.

     

    1 unit of credit: Prerequisites:  Either Earth Science or Science 8

     

    NEW COURSE DESCRIPTION - Physics Honors 9:

    Who Should Take Physics Honors 9?

     

    Any 8th grader with strong algebra skills and strong problem solving skills.  Students in this class will also need to learn some trigonometry associated with the physics regents curriculum.  Students will be recommended by North Middle School for this class.  Recommendations are based on a variety of factors, including math and science grades, student behaviors, and teacher recommendations.

     

    What Will We Be Studying In Physics Honors 9?

     

    Physics Honors 9 follows a course of study that is built upon the NYS Physics curriculum. This syllabus includes: introduction and math review, kinematics, dynamics, circular motion & gravity, momentum, work and energy, waves, electricity and magnetism, and modern physics.

     

    What Will Be Expected Of Me?

     

    You will be expected to regularly take part in challenging problem solving experiences.  Students will be required to work in groups to explore and explain novel phenomena, perform lab investigations which are often self-created, and work challenging mathematical problems in physics. This course requires independent thinking, problem solving, and engineering and a willingness to try things that you are unfamiliar with.  Students will need a non-graphing scientific calculator and a fully charged iPad as well as other classroom necessities.  Students will be expected to take the NYS Physics Regents Exam or equivalent and complete a minimum of 1200 minutes of graded lab work. Students should expect to study and practice outside of class every day.

     

    How Is The Course Taught?

     

    A variety of methods will be employed, including direct instruction, the use of demonstrations, model making, videos, graphical analysis, investigations, and a great deal of hands-on laboratory and group work.  Students will also participate in flipped classroom activities which move the introduction of the content to structured videos, watched outside of class, leaving room for hands-on activities and modeling with the teacher in class.

     

    What Are The Completion Requirements?

     

    Students will be required to take the NYS Regents Physics Examination or equivalent in June.  Students must complete 1200 minutes of laboratory work, which must be submitted, graded, recorded, and stored at school in order to sit for the Regents examination.

     

    1 unit of credit: Prerequisite: Recommendation from North Middle School

     

    Advanced Placement Physics 1:

     

    Who Should Take Advanced Placement Physics 1?

     

    Any student who has successfully completed Honors or AP Chemistry and performed at the top of their class in Advanced Placement Biology will be recommended for Advanced Placement Physics 1.  8th grade students with exceptional scores in Algebra and Earth Science may also be recommended by North Middle School.  Strong algebra and trigonometry skills are needed.  Students may self-select for this course if they are going to be juniors or seniors.  Please see the section on self selection at the beginning of the science course catalog for more information about this process.  Please note that this course is a mixed grade level course and can contain students from 9th through 12th grade.

     

    What Will We Be Studying In Advanced Placement Physics 1?

     

    This course follows the Advanced Placement Physics 1 syllabus and is equivalent to a first year college course in algebra-based physics. Topics include kinematics, dynamics, circular motion and gravitation, energy, momentum, simple harmonic motion, torque and rotational motion, mechanical waves and sound, electric, charge and electric force, and DC circuits.

     

    What Will Be Expected Of Me?

     

    You will be expected to regularly take part in challenging problem solving experiences.  Students will be required to work in groups to explore and explain novel phenomena, perform lab investigations which are often self-created, and work challenging mathematical problems in physics. This course requires independent thinking, problem solving, and engineering and a willingness to try things that you are unfamiliar with. 

    Students will need a calculator and a fully charged iPad as well as other classroom necessities.  Students should expect to study and practice extensively outside of class every day.

     

    How Is The Course Taught?

     

    A variety of methods will be employed, including direct instruction, the use of demonstrations, model making, videos, graphical analysis, investigations, and a great deal of hands-on laboratory and group work.  Students will also participate in flipped classroom activities which move the introduction of the content to structured videos, watched outside of class, leaving room for hands-on activities and modeling with the teacher in class.

     

    What Are The Completion Requirements?

     

    Students will be required to prepare for and take the Advanced Placement examination in Physics 1 in May, and might also take the NYS Physics Regents examination in June.  Students must complete 1200 minutes of laboratory work, which must be submitted, graded, recorded, and stored at school in order to sit for the Regents examination.

     

    1 unit of credit: Prerequisite: Physics 9, Chemistry, Biology, Algebra II/Trigonometry or equivalent, and Department recommendation.  

     

    TENTH GRADE

    Living Environment 10

     

    Who Should Take Living Environment 10?

     

    Any student who needs additional support in science after 9th grade will be recommended for Living Environment 10.  

     

    What Will We Be Studying In Living Environment 10?

     

    Living Environment 10 strictly follows a course of study that is in alignment with the NYS Living Environment curriculum.

     

    What Will Be Expected Of Me?

     

    Students will be required to work in groups to explore and explain novel phenomena, perform lab investigations, and do hands-on discovery learning activities. Students will need a four function calculator and a fully charged iPad as well as other classroom necessities outlined by the teacher.  Students will be expected to take the NYS Living Environment Regents Exam and complete a minimum of 1200 minutes of graded lab work; including four specified NYS lab activities.  Students who do not meet the laboratory requirements will not be eligible to sit for the regents exam.  Students should expect to study and practice outside of class every day.

     

    How Is The Course Taught?

     

    A variety of methods will be employed, including direct instruction, the use of demonstrations, model making, videos, graphical analysis, investigations, and a great deal of hands-on laboratory and group work.  Students will also participate in flipped classroom activities which move the introduction of the content to structured videos, watched outside of class, leaving room for hands-on activities and modeling with the teacher in class.

     

    What Are The Completion Requirements?

     

    Students will be required to take the NYS Regents examination in Biology in June.  Students must complete 1200 minutes of laboratory work, which must be submitted, graded, recorded, and stored at school in order to sit for the Regents examination.  

     

    1 unit of credit: Prerequisite:  Physics-9 

     

    Regents Chemistry:

     

    Who Should Take Regents Chemistry?

     

    Any student who has successfully completed Physics 9 will be recommended for Chemistry Regents.  

     

    What Will We Be Studying In Regents Chemistry?

     

    Regents Chemistry follows a course of study prescribed by the NYS Board of Regents.  Topics covered include:  matter and energy, atomic structure, bonding, the periodic table, stoichiometry, kinetics and equilibrium, acids and bases, oxidation-reduction reactions and electrochemistry, organic chemistry, and nuclear chemistry.

     

    What Will Be Expected Of Me?

     

    Students will be expected to engage in a variety of learning experiences.  Teacher directed instruction, engineering challenges, creation and execution of laboratory activities, various levels of group work, and discovery based learning are the norm.  The course is investigative in nature and students are often expected to work in groups.  Students will also be expected to take notes and participate in class discussions.  Students will need a non-graphing scientific calculator and a fully charged iPad as well as other classroom necessities.  Students should expect to study and practice outside of class every day.

     

    How Is The Course Taught?

     

    A variety of methods will be employed, including direct instruction, the use of demonstrations, model making, videos, graphical analysis, investigations, and a great deal of hands-on laboratory and group work.  Students will also participate in flipped classroom activities which move the introduction of the content to structured videos, watched outside of class, leaving room for hands-on problem solving with the teacher in class.

     

    What Are The Completion Requirements?

     

    Students will be required to take the NYS Regents examination in Chemistry in June.  Students must complete 1200 minutes of laboratory work, which must be submitted, graded, recorded, and stored at school in order to sit for the Regents examination.

     

    1 unit of credit  Prerequisite:  Physics 9, Physics 9 honors, or recommendation by a guidance counselor for new incoming students.

     

    Honors Chemistry:

     

    Who Should Take Honors Chemistry?

     

    Any student who has successfully completed Physics 9 Honors will be recommended for Honors Chemistry. In some cases, students who have shown exemplary performance in Physics 9 will be recommended for Honors Chemistry.

     

    What Will We Be Studying In Honors Chemistry?

     

    Honors Chemistry follows a course of study prescribed by the NYS Board of Regents, but the depth of study is in alignment with the SAT II Subject Test in Chemistry.  Topics covered include:  matter and energy, atomic structure, bonding, the periodic table, complex stoichiometry, kinetics and equilibrium, acids and bases, oxidation-reduction reactions and electrochemistry, organic chemistry, and nuclear chemistry.  Please note that this course is a math heavy course and a strong understanding of proportional relationships and algebraic principles is necessary for success.

     

    What Will Be Expected Of Me?

     

    You will be expected to regularly take part in challenging problem solving experiences.  Students will be required to work in groups to explore and explain novel phenomena, perform lab investigations which are often self-created, and work challenging mathematical problems in chemistry. This course requires independent thinking, problem solving, and engineering and a willingness to try things that you are unfamiliar with.  Students will need a non-graphing scientific calculator and a fully charged iPad as well as other classroom necessities.  Students will be expected to take the NYS Chemistry Regents Exam, complete a minimum of 1200 minutes of graded lab work. Students should expect to study and practice outside of class every day.

     

    How Is The Course Taught?

     

    A variety of methods will be employed, including direct instruction, the use of demonstrations, model making, videos, graphical analysis, investigations, and a great deal of hands-on laboratory and group work.  Students will also participate in flipped classroom activities which move the introduction of the content to structured videos, watched outside of class, leaving room for hands-on problem solving with the teacher in class.

     

    What Are The Completion Requirements?

     

    Students will be required to take the NYS Regents Examination in Chemistry in June.  Students must complete 1200 minutes of laboratory work, which must be submitted, graded, recorded, and stored at school in order to sit for the Regents examination.

     

    1 unit of credit Prerequisite: Physics 9 Honors or Physics 9 and a recommendation from the student’s 9th grade teacher

     

    ELEVENTH & TWELFTH GRADES

     

    Regents Biology:

     

    Who Should Take Regents Biology?

     

    Any student who has successfully completed Regents Chemistry will be recommended for Regents Biology.

     

    What Will We Be Studying In Regents Biology?

     

    Regents Biology follows a course of study that is built upon the NYS Living Environment curriculum. In addition to this syllabus the course involves biochemistry, molecular biology, and the anatomy and physiology of living organisms.  

     

    What Will Be Expected Of Me?

     

    You will be expected to regularly take part in challenging problem solving experiences.  Students will be required to work in groups to explore and explain novel phenomena, perform lab investigations which are often self-created, and synthesize new ideas from prior knowledge. This course requires independent thinking, problem solving, and engineering and a willingness to try things that you are unfamiliar with.  Students will need a four-function calculator and a fully charged iPad as well as other classroom necessities.  Students will be expected to take the NYS Living Environment Regents Exam, complete a minimum of 1200 minutes of graded lab work.  Students should expect to study and practice outside of class every day.

     

    How Is The Course Taught?

     

    A variety of methods will be employed, including direct instruction, the use of demonstrations, model making, videos, graphical analysis, investigations, and a great deal of hands-on laboratory and group work.  Students will also participate in flipped classroom activities which move the introduction of the content to structured videos, watched outside of class, leaving room for hands-on activities and modeling with the teacher in class.

     

    What Are The Completion Requirements?

     

    Students will be required to take the NYS Regents examination in Biology in June.  Students must complete 1200 minutes of laboratory work, which must be submitted, graded, recorded, and stored at school in order to sit for the Regents examination.  

     

    1 unit of credit: Prerequisite:  Physics-9 and Regents Chemistry or Physics 9 and Living Environment 10.

     

    Honors Biology:

     

    Who Should Take Honors Biology?

     

    Any student who has completed Honors Chemistry with strong marks and strong student behaviors can be recommended for Honors Biology.  Students who have shown exemplary performance in Chemistry Regents can also be recommended for Honors Biology.  

     

    What Will We Be Studying In Honors Biology?

     

    Honors Biology follows a course of study that is built upon the NYS Living Environment curriculum. In addition to this syllabus the course involves biochemistry, molecular biology, and the anatomy and physiology of living organisms.  The level of instruction will match that of the former SAT II Biology curriculum.

     

    What Will Be Expected Of Me?

     

    You will be expected to regularly take part in challenging problem solving experiences.  Students will be required to work in groups to explore and explain novel phenomena, perform lab investigations which are often self-created, and synthesize new ideas from prior knowledge. This course focuses much more heavily on molecular chemistry and genetics, and requires that students understand complex chemical interaction in order to be successful.  This course requires independent thinking, problem solving, and engineering and a willingness to try things that you are unfamiliar with.  Students will need a four-function calculator and a fully charged iPad as well as other classroom necessities.  Students will be expected to take the NYS Living Environment Regents Exam, complete a minimum of 1200 minutes of graded lab work.  Students should expect to study and practice outside of class every day.

     

    How Is The Course Taught?

     

    A variety of methods will be employed, including direct instruction, the use of demonstrations, model making, videos, graphical analysis, investigations, and a great deal of hands-on laboratory and group work.  Students will also participate in flipped classroom activities which move the introduction of the content to structured videos, watched outside of class, leaving room for hands-on activities and modeling with the teacher in class.

     

    What Are The Completion Requirements?

     

    Students will be required to take the NYS Regents examination in Biology in June.  Students must complete 1200 minutes of laboratory work, which must be submitted, graded, recorded, and stored at school in order to sit for the Regents examination.  

     

    1 unit of credit: Prerequisite:  Physics-9 and Regents Chemistry  with a teacher recommendation or Physics-9 and Honors Chemistry

     

    Advanced Placement Biology:

     

    Who Should Take Advanced Placement Biology?

     

    Any student who has completed Honors Chemistry with high marks and strong student behaviors will be recommended for Advanced Placement Biology.  In some cases, students who have shown exemplary performance in Chemistry Regents will be recommended for Advanced Placement Biology.  Students may self-select for this course.  Please see the section on self selection at the beginning of the science course catalog for more information about this process.

     

    What Will We Be Studying In Advanced Placement Biology?

     

    The Advanced Placement Biology course is a two semester college level course designed for students who have a firm mastery of the concepts in high school science and who have demonstrated ability in critical thinking and in mathematical and laboratory skills.  Topics studied include biological chemistry, cells, energy transformations, molecular genetics, and ecology.  Laboratory work is experimental and quantitative, rather than descriptive.  This course is both content and vocabulary heavy and students are expected to evaluate and respond to novel information that will not specifically be taught in class.  Scientific application is a main focus of this course.

     

    What Will Be Expected Of Me?

     

    You will be expected to regularly take part in challenging problem solving experiences.  Students will be required to work in groups to explore and explain novel phenomena, perform lab investigations which are often self-created, and work challenging mathematical problems in biology. This course requires independent thinking, problem solving, and engineering and a willingness to try things that you are unfamiliar with.  Students will need a non-graphing scientific calculator and a fully charged iPad as well as other classroom necessities.  Students will be expected to take the NYS Biology Regents Exam, complete a minimum of 1200 minutes of graded lab work. Students should expect to study and practice extensively outside of class every day.

     

    How Is The Course Taught?

     

    A variety of methods will be employed, including direct instruction, the use of demonstrations, model making, videos, graphical analysis, investigations, and a great deal of hands-on laboratory and group work.  Students will also participate in flipped classroom activities which move the introduction of the content to structured videos, watched outside of class, leaving room for hands-on activities and modeling with the teacher in class.  The weeks following the AP exam will be devoted to the completion of individual extended projects and the completion of the 4 required NYS labs for Living Environment.

     

    What Are The Completion Requirements?

     

    Students will be required to prepare for and take the Advanced Placement examination in Biology in May and the Biology Regents in June, if not previously completed.  Students must complete 1200 minutes of laboratory work, which must be submitted, graded, recorded, and stored at school in order to sit for the Regents examination.

     

    1 unit of credit: Prerequisites: Physics, Chemistry, and Department recommendation. 

     

    Regents Physics:

    Who Should Take Regents Physics?

     

    Any student who has successfully completed Regents Biology can be recommended for Regents Physics.  8th grade students who are recommended by North Middle School may also enroll in the course.  Please note that this course is a mixed grade level course and can contain students from 9th through 12th grade.

     

    What Will We Be Studying In Regents Physics?

     

    Regents Physics follows a course of study that is built upon the NYS Physics curriculum. This syllabus includes: introduction and math review, kinematics, dynamics, circular motion & gravity, momentum, work and energy, waves, electricity and magnetism, and modern physics.

     

    What Will Be Expected Of Me?

     

    You will be expected to regularly take part in challenging problem solving experiences.  Students will be required to work in groups to explore and explain novel phenomena, perform lab investigations which are often self-created, and work challenging mathematical problems in physics. This course requires independent thinking, problem solving, and engineering and a willingness to try things that you are unfamiliar with.  Students will need a non-graphing scientific calculator and a fully charged iPad as well as other classroom necessities.  Students will be expected to take the NYS Physics Regents Exam or equivalent and complete a minimum of 1200 minutes of graded lab work. Students should expect to study and practice outside of class every day.

     

    How Is The Course Taught?

     

    A variety of methods will be employed, including direct instruction, the use of demonstrations, model making, videos, graphical analysis, investigations, and a great deal of hands-on laboratory and group work.  Students will also participate in flipped classroom activities which move the introduction of the content to structured videos, watched outside of class, leaving room for hands-on activities and modeling with the teacher in class.

     

    What Are The Completion Requirements?

     

    Students will be required to take the NYS Regents Physics Examination or equivalent in June.  Students must complete 1200 minutes of laboratory work, which must be submitted, graded, recorded, and stored at school in order to sit for the Regents examination.

     

    1 unit of credit: Prerequisite: Physics 9, Regents Chemistry and Regents Biology

     

    Advanced Placement Physics 1:

     

    Who Should Take Advanced Placement Physics 1?

     

    Any student who has successfully completed Honors or AP Chemistry and performed at the top of their class in Advanced Placement Biology will be recommended for Advanced Placement Physics 1.  8th grade students with exceptional scores in Algebra and Earth Science may also be recommended by North Middle School.  Strong algebra and trigonometry skills are needed.  Students may self-select for this course if they are going to be juniors or seniors.  Please see the section on self selection at the beginning of the science course catalog for more information about this process.  Please note that this course is a mixed grade level course and can contain students from 9th through 12th grade.

     

    What Will We Be Studying In Advanced Placement Physics 1?

     

    This course follows the Advanced Placement Physics 1 syllabus and is equivalent to a first year college course in algebra-based physics. Topics include kinematics, dynamics, circular motion and gravitation, energy, momentum, simple harmonic motion, torque and rotational motion, mechanical waves and sound, electric, charge and electric force, and DC circuits.

     

    What Will Be Expected Of Me?

     

    You will be expected to regularly take part in challenging problem solving experiences.  Students will be required to work in groups to explore and explain novel phenomena, perform lab investigations which are often self-created, and work challenging mathematical problems in physics. This course requires independent thinking, problem solving, and engineering and a willingness to try things that you are unfamiliar with. 

    Students will need a calculator and a fully charged iPad as well as other classroom necessities.  Students should expect to study and practice extensively outside of class every day.

     

    How Is The Course Taught?

     

    A variety of methods will be employed, including direct instruction, the use of demonstrations, model making, videos, graphical analysis, investigations, and a great deal of hands-on laboratory and group work.  Students will also participate in flipped classroom activities which move the introduction of the content to structured videos, watched outside of class, leaving room for hands-on activities and modeling with the teacher in class.

     

    What Are The Completion Requirements?

     

    Students will be required to prepare for and take the Advanced Placement examination in Physics 1 in May, and might also take the NYS Physics Regents examination in June.  Students must complete 1200 minutes of laboratory work, which must be submitted, graded, recorded, and stored at school in order to sit for the Regents examination.

     

    1 unit of credit: Prerequisite: Physics 9, Chemistry, Biology, Algebra II/Trigonometry or equivalent, and Department recommendation.  

     

    Advanced Placement Physics C

     

    Who Should Take Advanced Placement Physics C?

     

    Any student who has successfully completed Physics Honors 9, Honors or AP Chemistry and performed at the top of their class in Advanced Placement Biology can be recommended for Advanced Placement Physics C.  Students will also need to be concurrently enrolled in Calculus, preferably BC Calculus.  Students may self-select for this course.  Please see the section on self selection at the beginning of the science course catalog for more information about this process.

     

    What Will We Be Studying In  Advanced Placement Physics C?

     

    This course follows the Advanced Placement Physics C syllabus and is equivalent to a first year college course in calculus based physics. There are two AP Exams at the end of the course.  Topics include kinematics; Newton’s laws of motion; work, energy, and power; systems of particles and linear momentum; rotation; oscillations; gravitation; electrostatics; conductors, capacitors, dielectrics; electric circuits; magnetic fields; electromagnetism.

     

    What Will Be Expected Of Me?

     

    You will be expected to regularly take part in challenging problem solving experiences.  Students will be required to work in groups to explore and explain novel phenomena, perform lab investigations which are often self-created, and work challenging mathematical problems in physics using algebra, trigonometry, and calculus. This course requires independent thinking, problem solving, and engineering and a willingness to try things that you are unfamiliar with.  Students will need a calculator and a fully charged iPad as well as other classroom necessities.  Students should expect to study and practice extensively outside of class every day.

     

    How Is The Course Taught?

     

    A variety of methods will be employed, including direct instruction, the use of demonstrations, model making, videos, graphical analysis, investigations, and a great deal of hands-on laboratory and group work.  Students will also participate in flipped classroom activities which move the introduction of the content to structured videos, watched outside of class, leaving room for hands-on activities and modeling with the teacher in class.

     

    What Are The Completion Requirements?

     

    Students will be required to prepare for and take the Advanced Placement examinations in Mechanics and Electricity and Magnetism in May.  Please note there are two separate AP exams that are completed at the end of this course.

     

    1 unit of credit: Prerequisites:  Honors or AP Biology, Honors or AP Chemistry, AP Calculus (concurrent enrollment), and Department recommendation.  

     

    Advanced Placement Chemistry

     

    Who Should Take  Advanced Placement Chemistry?

     

    Any student who has successfully completed Chemistry and performed at the top of their class in Advanced Placement Biology will be recommended for Advanced Placement Chemistry as a senior.  Students enrolled in Physics Honors 9 may also be recommended for Advanced Placement Chemistry if they are performing at the very top of their class.  Students may self-select for this course.  Please see the section on self selection at the beginning of the science course catalog for more information about this process.

     

    What Will We Be Studying In Advanced Placement Chemistry?

     

    The Advanced Placement Chemistry course is a two semester college level course designed for students who have a firm mastery of the concepts in high school science and who have demonstrated ability in critical thinking and in mathematical and laboratory skills.  Topics studied include: atomic structure and properties, molecular and ionic compound structure and properties, intermolecular forces and properties, chemical reactions, kinetics, thermodynamics, equilibrium, acids and bases, and applications of thermodynamics

     

    What Will Be Expected Of Me?

     

    You will be expected to regularly take part in challenging problem solving experiences.  Students will be required to work in groups to explore and explain novel phenomena, perform lab investigations which are often self-created, and work challenging mathematical problems in chemistry using algebra. This course requires independent thinking, problem solving, and a willingness to try things that you are unfamiliar with.  Students will need a calculator and a fully charged iPad as well as other classroom necessities.  Students should expect to study and practice extensively outside of class every day.

     

    How Is The Course Taught?

     

    A variety of methods will be employed, including direct instruction, the use of demonstrations, model making, videos, graphical analysis, investigations, and a great deal of hands-on laboratory and group work.  Students will also participate in flipped classroom activities which move the introduction of the content to structured videos, watched outside of class, leaving room for hands-on activities and modeling with the teacher in class.  The weeks following the AP exam will be devoted to the completion of individual extended projects.

     

    What Are The Completion Requirements?

     

    Students will be required to prepare for and take the Advanced Placement examination in Chemistry in May and underclassmen will also take the Chemistry Regents in June.  Students must complete 1200 minutes of laboratory work, which must be submitted, graded, recorded, and stored at school in order to sit for the Regents examination.

     

    1 unit of credit: Prerequisites: For seniors - Physics 9, Chemistry, AP Biology, and Department recommendation. For sophomores - Physics Honors 9 and Departmental recommendation.  

     

    Advanced Placement Environmental Science

     

    Who Should Take Advanced Placement Environmental Science?

     

    Any student who has successfully completed biology regents and chemistry regents with strong grades may take this course. Students may self-select for this course.  Please see the section on self selection at the beginning of the science course catalog for more information about this process.

     

    What Will We Be Studying In A.P. Environmental Science?

     

    The course is designed to be the equivalent of a one-semester, introductory college course in environmental science.  Topics studied include environmental issues, aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, ecology, weather and climate, population dynamics, geology and geological processes, and pollution.  Laboratory work is in the form of field studies and other experimental and analytical studies.  Assigned readings include current articles and excerpts from books.

     

    What Will Be Expected Of Me?

     

    You will be expected to regularly take part in challenging problem solving experiences.  Students will be required to work in groups to explore and explain novel phenomena, perform lab investigations which are often self-created, and work challenging mathematical problems in chemistry using algebra. This course requires independent thinking, problem solving, and a willingness to try things that you are unfamiliar with.  Students will need a calculator and a fully charged iPad as well as other classroom necessities.  Students should expect to study and practice outside of class every day.

     

    How Is The Course Taught?

     

    A variety of methods will be employed, including direct instruction, the use of demonstrations, model making, videos, graphical analysis, investigations, and a great deal of hands-on laboratory and group work.  Students will also participate in flipped classroom activities which move the introduction of the content to structured videos, watched outside of class, leaving room for hands-on activities and modeling with the teacher in class.  The weeks following the AP exam will be devoted to the completion of individual extended projects which are a requirement for course completion.

     

    What Are The Completion Requirements?

     

    Students will be required to prepare for and take the Advanced Placement examination in Environmental Science in May.

     

    1 unit of credit: Prerequisites:  Physics 9, Regents Chemistry and Regents Biology, and Department recommendation.

     

    ELECTIVES

     

    ***NOTE - Students who have enrolled in an AP course as a senior and who have shown strong science and math skills throughout their high school career may concurrently enroll in an additional science elective, space permitting, with the permission of their guidance counselor and the science department chairperson.  Not all elective courses are offered every year.  Please speak with your guidance counselor about the offerings that are available to you.

     

    Human Anatomy and Physiology

     

    Who Should Take Human Anatomy and Physiology?

     

    Any student who has completed Regents Chemistry/Regents Biology can be recommended for this course.  Special recommendations can be made through guidance with the permission of the science department chairperson.

     

    What Will We Be Studying In Human Anatomy and Physiology?

     

    This is a single period, elective course.  This course provides a detailed study of the anatomy and physiology of human organ systems as well as the impacts of disease on these systems.  Students will learn about how life choices and environmental aspects can affect the health of these systems.  

     

    What Will Be Expected Of Me?

     

    Students will be expected to engage in a variety of learning experiences.  Teacher directed instruction, creation and execution of laboratory activities, various levels of group work, projects and presentations, and discovery based learning are the norm.  The course is investigative in nature and students are often expected to work in groups.  Students will also be expected to take notes and participate in class discussions.  Students may be required to read and report on current events pertaining to class material.  Students are required to have a fully charged iPad and other required materials. Students should expect to prepare for class every day.

     

    How Is The Course Taught?

     

    A variety of methods will be employed, including direct instruction, the use of demonstrations, model making, videos, graphical analysis, investigations, and a great deal of hands-on laboratory and group work.  Students will also participate in flipped classroom activities which move the introduction of the content to structured videos, watched outside of class, leaving room for hands-on activities and modeling with the teacher in class.

     

    What Are The Completion Requirements?

     

    Students must successfully complete the required coursework for Human Anatomy and Physiology.  

     

    1 unit of credit: Prerequisite:  Physics, Chemistry, and Biology or a special recommendation through guidance with departmental approval.

     

    Astronomy

     

    Who Should Take Human Astronomy?

     

    Any student who has completed Regents Chemistry/Regents Biology can be recommended for this course.  Special recommendations can be made through guidance with the permission of the science department chairperson.

     

    What Will We Be Studying In Astronomy?

     

    This is a single period, elective course.  This course provides an introduction to the study of the physical principles involved in Astronomy.  The class includes investigation of the universe as a whole, our solar system, other galaxies and cosmology, and stars and stellar evolution.  

    What Will Be Expected Of Me?

     

    Students will be expected to engage in a variety of learning experiences.  Teacher directed instruction, creation and execution of laboratory activities, various levels of group work, projects and presentations, and discovery based learning are the norm.  The course is investigative in nature and students are often expected to work in groups.  Students will also be expected to take notes and participate in class discussions.  Students may be required to read and report on current events pertaining to class material.  Students are required to have a fully charged iPad and other required materials. Students should expect to prepare for class every day.

     

    How Is The Course Taught?

     

    A variety of methods will be employed, including direct instruction, the use of demonstrations, model making, videos, graphical analysis, investigations, and a great deal of hands-on laboratory and group work.  Students will also participate in flipped classroom activities which move the introduction of the content to structured videos, watched outside of class, leaving room for hands-on activities and modeling with the teacher in class.

     

    What Are The Completion Requirements?

     

    Students must successfully complete the required coursework for Astronomy.  

     

    1 unit of credit: Prerequisite:  Physics, Chemistry, and Biology. Special recommendations can be made through guidance with the permission of the science department chairperson. 

     

    Human Impact and Environmental Relationships

     

    Who Should Take Human Impact and Environmental Relationships?

     

    Any student who has completed Regents Chemistry/Regents Biology can be recommended for this course.  Special recommendations can be made through guidance with the permission of the science department chairperson.  

     

    What Will We Be Studying In Human Impact and Environmental Relationships?

     

    This is a single period, elective course.  The curriculum is structured around learning relevant environmental studies as well as the effects of humans on changes in the environment.  Environmental justice, ecology, ecosystems, global climate and biomes, biodiversity, population dynamics, systems and resource use, consumption, pollution, climate change, and sustainability will all be covered.  

     

    What Will Be Expected Of Me?

     

    Students will be expected to engage in a variety of learning experiences.  Teacher directed instruction, creation and execution of laboratory activities, various levels of group work, projects and presentations, and discovery based learning are the norm.  The course is investigative in nature and students are often expected to work in groups.  Students will also be expected to take notes and participate in class discussions.  Students may be required to read and report on current events pertaining to class material.  Students are required to have a fully charged iPad and other required materials. Students should expect to prepare for class every day.

     

    How Is The Course Taught?

     

    A variety of methods will be employed, including direct instruction, the use of demonstrations, model making, videos, graphical analysis, investigations, and a great deal of hands-on laboratory and group work.  Students will also participate in flipped classroom activities which move the introduction of the content to structured videos, watched outside of class, leaving room for hands-on activities and modeling with the teacher in class.

     

    What Are The Completion Requirements?

     

    Students must successfully complete the required coursework for Human Impact and Environmental Relationships.  

     

    1 unit of credit: Prerequisite:  Physics, Chemistry, and Biology.  Special recommendation can be requested through guidance with the approval of the science department chairperson.

     

    Forensic Science

     

    Who Should Take Forensic Science?

     

    Any student who has completed Chemistry and Biology can be recommended for this course.  Special recommendations can be made through guidance with the permission of the science department chairperson. 

     

    What Will We Be Studying In Forensic Science?

     

    This is a single period elective course.  Forensic science is an investigatory course in which students will apply their prior knowledge of biology, chemistry, physics and mathematics to the popular field of crime scene investigation.  Students will use an inquiry-based approach to learn about the tools and techniques used by forensic scientists in solving crimes.  Students will learn terminology and investigate procedures related to crime scene, questioning, interviewing, criminal behavior characteristics, truth detection, and scientific procedures.  Using scientific methods, students will collect and analyze evidence through case studies and simulated crime scenes such as fingerprint analysis, ballistics, and blood spatter analysis.  The course will use an NGSS-based approach to evidence collection, claim formation, data analysis, and argumentation.  Students will also learn about the history, legal aspects, and career options for forensic science.

     

    What Will Be Expected Of Me?

     

    Students will be expected to engage in a variety of learning experiences.  Teacher directed instruction, creation and execution of laboratory activities, various levels of group work, projects and presentations, and discovery based learning are the norm.  The course is investigative in nature and students are often expected to work in groups.  Students will also be expected to take notes and participate in class discussions.  Students may be required to read and report on current events pertaining to class material.  Students are required to have a fully charged iPad and other required materials. Students should expect to prepare for class every day.

     

    How Is The Course Taught?

     

    A variety of methods will be employed, including direct instruction, the use of demonstrations, model making, videos, graphical analysis, investigations, and a great deal of hands-on laboratory and group work.  Students will also participate in flipped classroom activities which move the introduction of the content to structured videos, watched outside of class, leaving room for hands-on activities and modeling with the teacher in class.

     

    What Are The Completion Requirements?

     

    Students must successfully complete the required coursework for Forensic Science.  

     

    1 unit of credit: Prerequisite:  Physics, Chemistry, and Biology.  Special recommendation can be requested through guidance with the permission of the science department chairperson.

     

    Science in Our World I and II

     

    Who Should Take Science in Our World I and II?

     

    Any student who has completed Living Environment 10/Regents Biology can be recommended for this course.  

     

    What Will We Be Studying In Science in Our World I and II?

     

    This is a non-laboratory elective course which deals with issues of current concern to society. Topics discussed in class are based on student interest as well as current issues.  While there are prepared topics to share with students, students are also encouraged to bring articles and other materials to support and guide the discussion. This course is an extension of current events and a good deal of the activities in this class will be based on current issues that are impacting our society.  Please note that topics taught in Science in Our World I differ from those in Science in Our World II and therefore a student can take these classes in consecutive years without repeating material.

     

    What Will Be Expected Of Me?

     

    Students will be expected to engage in a variety of learning experiences.  Teacher directed instruction, engineering challenges, creation and execution of laboratory activities, various levels of group work, and discovery based learning are the norm.  The course is investigative in nature and students are often expected to work in groups.  Students will also be expected to take notes and participate in class discussions.  Students will also be required to read and report on current events pertaining to class material.  Students are required to have a fully charged iPad and other required materials. Students should expect to prepare for class every day.

     

     

    How Is The Course Taught?

     

    A variety of methods will be employed, including direct instruction, the use of demonstrations, model making, videos, graphical analysis, investigations, and a great deal of hands-on laboratory and group work.  Students will also participate in flipped classroom activities which move the introduction of the content to structured videos, watched outside of class, leaving room for hands-on activities and modeling with the teacher in class.

     

    What Are The Completion Requirements?

     

    Students must successfully complete the required coursework for Science in Our World  I and II.  

     

    1 unit of credit: Prerequisite:  Living Environment10/Biology Regents and Department recommendation.

     

    Research 9

     

    Who Should Take Research 9?

     

    Students who have strong student skills, good time management, are self-motivated, and are strong in both math and science should consider this additional elective course.  Students must apply while at North Middle School and will be accepted by the North High School Department Chair and the North High School Science Research Director. 9th graders who are new to the district can reach out to the science department head or the director of science research to discuss enrollment in this course.

     

    What Will We Be Studying In Research 9?

     

    Research 9 is devoted entirely to teaching 9th grade students basic research skills.  In teams, students will design and implement a psychology project and will learn how to properly control scientific experiments, how to keep a detailed experimental notebook, how to search the professional literature, how to statistically analyze data, and how to present findings to the public in the forms of: a scientific paper, 4 PowerPoint presentations, and a poster board display.

     

    What Will Be Expected Of Me?

     

    You will be expected to meet regularly with the science research teacher during class time.  You will be expected to complete specific assignments including a research paper, statistics assignments, 4 PowerPoint presentations, and a poster board.  All students compete as teams at the end of the year in the JLM GNNHS Freshman World Cup (the freshman in-house science competition); presenting in this competition is mandatory.  Additionally, students will conduct several other investigations that exemplify various laboratory techniques and methods of statistical analysis.  You will be expected to do work for Research 9 independently.  Students in Research 9 are also expected to attend the annual Senior Symposium, typically held in December, and Celebrate Science Night, typically held in May.  These events take place outside of the school day and dates are shared well in advance. 

     

    How Is The Course Taught?

     

    Students meet regularly with the science research teacher to discuss their ongoing work and to discuss the process of developing and executing a research project.  Students will also be taught statistics, the skills needed for paper writing, how to create and present a PowerPoint presentation, and how to create a poster board display.  Some self-study in the form of videos and manuals specific to the course are required.

     

    What Are The Completion Requirements?

     

    To complete the course, a student must submit and present a psychology-based research project and meet all other course requirements.

     

    1 unit of credit: Prerequisite:  Department permission.  Enrollment is limited.  Students must apply by the deadline.

     

    Research Project Seminar

     

    Who Should Take Research Project Seminar?

     

    10th and 11th grade students who have strong student skills, good time management, are self-motivated, and are strong in both math and science should consider this additional elective course.  Students must apply to and will be accepted by the North High School Department Chair and the North High School Science Research Director.  Students new to the district should reach out to the Science Department Chair or the Director of Science Research in order to apply for admission to the course. Students do not have to have taken Research 9 in order to apply for Research Project Seminar.

     

    What Will We Be Studying In Research Project Seminar?

     

    Research Project Seminar will outline the process of developing an idea for science and/or engineering research and will emphasize a stepwise approach by which that idea is brought to fruition in a completed project.  Students are responsible for identifying their area of research.  Beyond this, you will be studying in depth the topics most directly concerned with your particular area of research.

     

    What Will Be Expected Of Me?

     

    You will be expected to meet regularly with the science research teacher during class time.  You will be expected to complete specific assignments including a full research paper, statistics assignments, 4 PowerPoint presentations, and a poster board. You will be required to enter at least one external science competition, usually occurring during the spring; presenting in at least one competition is mandatory.  You will be expected to do most of the work for the Research Project Seminar independently during your class time.  Students in Research Project Seminar are also expected to attend the annual Senior Symposium, typically held in December, and Celebrate Science Night, typically held in May.  These events take place outside of the school day and dates are shared well in advance.

     

    How Is The Course Taught?

     

    Students meet regularly with the science research teacher to discuss their ongoing work and to discuss the process of developing and executing a research project.  Students will also be taught statistics and skills in paper writing, though not to the same degree as in Research 9.  Self-study in the form of videos and manuals specific to the course are required.

     

    What Are The Completion Requirements?

     

    To complete the course, a student must submit and display a significant research project in science and/or engineering and meet all other course requirements.

     

    1 unit of credit: Prerequisite:  Department permission.  Enrollment is limited. Students must apply by the deadline

    .

     

    Senior Science Research

     

    Who Should Take Senior Research?

     

    Qualified senior science students who have completed a significant science research project by September 1st of their senior year at an independent research facility should register for this class.  A willingness to self-teach complex scientific ideas and techniques and exquisite time management are a must.  Students do not have to have completed research in 9th - 11th grade, though this will significantly increase the likelihood of successful placement in a professional lab over the summer of junior year.

     

    What Will Be Expected Of Me?

     

    You will need to find a mentor prior to the summer of your senior year who will support and guide your senior research.  You will be expected to conduct and complete significant research during the summer before your senior year.  You will be expected to meet a series of deadlines leading to the completion of The Regeneron Science Talent Search application and paper; many of these deadlines occur over the summer.  Senior projects must be done individually, as group projects are not eligible for the Regeneron STS.  In addition, you will be expected to enter your paper in several other science competitions including the Long Island Science & Engineering Fair, The New York State Science and Engineering Fair, the Junior Science and Humanities Symposium, and the WAC Lighting Invitational Science Fair.  Seniors will also be expected to be present for and judge the Freshman in-house competition. Students in Senior Research are also expected to attend the annual Senior Symposium at which they will present their research, typically held in December, and Celebrate Science Night, typically held in May.  These events take place outside of the school day and dates are shared well in advance.  Please note that much of your first quarter grade will be calculated based on your summer work.

     

    How Is The Course Taught?

     

    Students meet independently with their science research teacher during the summer, typically by ZOOM, and then during the regular school day, during their science research period to plan and execute their paper as well as to write their entrance essays for Regeneron and complete their other course requirements.  

     

    What Are The Completion Requirements?

     

    Students must complete the Regeneron Science Talent Search application as well as a formal research paper, by established deadlines.  Failure to submit a viable application to the Regeneron STS will result in a significant grade reduction.  Additionally, students will submit their paper to other competitions as appropriate.  Students are also required to create a Slides presentation and a poster board for their project, which will be presented at the Senior Science Symposium.  Attendance at the Senior Science Symposium is mandatory.

     

    1 unit of credit:  Prerequisite:  Department permission required.  Students must apply by the deadline and find a mentor under whom they will perform their research.





     

     

     

    SOCIAL STUDIES

    The study of people and events in our world, past, present and future, is so significant and so vast that the following courses in the Social Studies Department can only attempt to provide you with an introduction to your world and to help you develop important skills that might affect meaningful changes.

    All students are required to have four years of Social Studies for graduation and are encouraged to take a 5th year elective.  Seniors are required by state law to take one semester of Economics and one of Politics and Government.  However, these requirements can be met in a variety of ways.

    NINTH GRADE

    SOCIAL STUDIES 9 - GLOBAL HISTORY I

    This is the first course in a two-year sequence that culminates in a New York State Global History  Regents Examination.  The course presents the major historical and cultural events from the Neolithic period through the 18th century.  The new exam will cover skills from 9th & 10th grade, but historical materials only from c. Scientific Revolution through the present. Students will work with primary and secondary source documents and develop reading, writing, and analytical skills.

    NOTE:  SOCIAL STUDIES 9 HONORS – New York State requires that all students complete two years of Global History and Geography.  All ninth grade students must complete the Regents curriculum; however, students will be given the opportunity to earn honors credit within their Social Studies class.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Social Studies 8

    NOTE:  All 9th grade English and Social Studies classes will be paired and scheduled to meet during consecutive periods.  This will permit flexible use of class time and grouping of students as well as create opportunities for interdisciplinary projects.

    TENTH GRADE

    SOCIAL STUDIES 10 - GLOBAL HISTORY II

    This is the second course in the sequence that culminates in a New York State Global History Regents.  The course presents world events from the mid-eighteenth century to the present.  Emphasis will be on analysis of primary source documents, writing skills, and preparation for the Regents exam.. The new exam will cover skills from 9th & 10th grade, but historical material from the Scientific Revolution through the present.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Global History I

     

    AP WORLD HISTORY

    A.P. World History offers qualified, motivated sophomores the opportunity to “do history” by guiding them through the steps a historian would take in analyzing historical events and evidence worldwide.  The course offers balanced global coverage, including Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe and Oceania. This course is rigorous and demanding. It is intended to be a college-level history course and students can expect to spend 7-10 hours per week reading, writing, and analyzing historical material.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Global History I and Departmental recommendation.

    ELEVENTH GRADE

    SOCIAL STUDIES 11 REGENTS – UNITED STATES HISTORY, GOVERNMENT AND GEOGRAPHY

    This course traces U. S. History from the formation of our country and the writing of the Constitution to the present.  Upon the completion of this course, all students will take the NY State U. S. History Regents exam.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Passage of Global History I & II

     

    SOCIAL STUDIES 11 – ADVANCED PLACEMENT AMERICAN HISTORY

    The Advanced Placement course in American History is a college- level course designed for those students entering 11th grade who have demonstrated high level critical thinking skills, the ability to write thematic and DBQ essays, and are able to read and synthesize college-level material.  Students must be prepared to devote a minimum of seven-ten hours per week of preparation outside the classroom in order to adequately complete the reading and writing assignments.

    In May, students will be required to prepare for and take the Advanced Placement Exam in American History.  In addition, students will be required to take the NY State Regents exam in American History in June.

    1 unit of credit                                                                                   Prerequisite:  Social Studies 10 and Departmental  recommendation. 

    Those not receiving the department’s recommendation will be required to follow the self-selection procedure.

    TWELFTH GRADE

    Twelfth grade students must successfully complete one semester of Politics & Government and one semester of Economics.  AP Economics, AP European History, and AP US Government are appropriate options for those students who meet the academic requirements and demands of these AP courses.  Seniors should also consider the interdisciplinary senior options listed below.

     

    SOCIAL STUDIES 12 - POLITICS AND GOVERNMENT

    This half-year class aims to provide students with opportunities to become engaged in the political process by acquiring the knowledge and practicing the skills necessary for active citizenship.  Over the course of the semester, students will examine local, national, and global examples of political systems at work, civic participation, and the extent to which civil liberties are protected. 

    This course meets New York State requirements for graduation and is intended for seniors not considered for or interested in AP United States Government.        

     1/2 unit of credit

    SOCIAL STUDIES 12 - ECONOMICS

    This half-year course will examine the basic principles of the United States free-market economy and the relationship between and among individuals, state and federal government, and businesses on a national and global level. 
    Students will also examine their individual responsibility for managing personal finances, and consider cost-benefit analysis for sound decision making.

    This course meets New York State requirements for graduation and is intended for seniors not considered for
    or interested in AP Economics​.

    1/2 unit of credit

     SOCIAL STUDIES 12 - ADVANCED PLACEMENT ECONOMICS

    The AP Economics course is a full-year college level course designed for those students who have demonstrated marked proficiency in the Social Studies area and have an aptitude in math and quantitative analysis.

    A minimum of six-eight hours of outside work per week will be required to adequately complete the reading and writing assignments.  In addition, students will complete the Politics and Government requirement through community service or research projects.  In May, students will be required to prepare for and take both microeconomics and macroeconomics AP Examinations.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Social Studies 11 or AP American History and Departmental recommendation.

                                                                                       

    SOCIAL STUDIES 12 - ADVANCED PLACEMENT EUROPEAN HISTORY

    The Advanced Placement European History course is a college level course designed for 12th graders who read and write at a level of freshmen attending selective universities, who work well independently, who have fully developed study skills and who enjoy intellectual discussions in the pursuit of knowledge.  The curriculum focuses on the following themes:  political, intellectual, cultural, social and economic patterns in the study of seven countries over a span of five hundred years.

    Students will develop an appreciation for the art, literature and philosophical contributions made by those who created our Western heritage.

    Students will participate in research seminars in Economics and take Politics & Government through an independent study, community service or research projects.

    In May, all students will prepare for and take the AP exam in European History.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Social Studies 11 or AP American History and Department recommendation.                                                                                             

    AP UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT

    The Advanced Placement course in U.S. Government is a full year college level course designed for those students entering 11th or 12th grade who have demonstrated a high level of ability in critical reading, writing, and thinking skills.  Students must be prepared to devote a minimum of three-five hours per week of preparation outside of the classroom in order to adequately complete the reading and writing assignments.

    In May, students will be required to prepare for and take the Advanced Placement Exam in U. S. Government.  This course satisfies the Politics and Government requirements for senior year; however, it does not satisfy the New York State Economics requirement.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Social Studies 10 and Department recommendation

    SENIOR SEMINAR

    This is a team-taught interdisciplinary class combining Social Studies, English and Business.  Students are offered a unique opportunity to explore the social, historical, political and economic trends of a specific American decade while they read literature and examine other media from that time period.  Students will also research an area of interest from a particular decade such as music, technology, politics, art, fashion, or business. 

    SENIOR SEMINAR is a two-period, two credit course program that fulfills the 12th grade English and Social Studies requirements.

    2 credits; Prerequisite:  American History

    ELECTIVES

    AP  PSYCHOLOGY

    This full year AP course introduces students to the discipline of psychology and explores the history of psychology, the different theoretical approaches that underline explanations of behavior, and the contemporary research methods used by psychologists.

    The course traces the emergence of psychology in the nineteenth century, and covers the development of the major “schools of thought” of psychology.  Units include:  biological bases of behavior, perception, social psychology, treatments of psychological disorders, consciousness, and learning.  Students learn how these approaches guide research and to use statistics in analyzing data.  Students will be required to prepare for and take the AP examination in May.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:   Social Studies 10 Regents and Department recommendation. 

    Those not receiving department recommendations will be required to meet with counselor, department head and parents to ensure full awareness of the high level of commitment and skill required to succeed in AP Psychology.  This course is offered to qualified juniors and seniors as an elective.  This course does not fulfill any New York State requirements.

    PSYCHOLOGY

    The study of psychology is often associated with mental illness and/or therapy.  Students are usually fascinated by psychology because of their own experiences or the prevalence of mental illness in movies and the media.  Psychology is the systematic, scientific study of behaviors and mental processes.  In essence, psychologists attempt to explain why people do what they do.  This one-semester elective offers students interested in psychology an opportunity to explore some of the more exciting topics in an introductory course, without the demands of the A.P. curriculum and culminating A.P. exam.  This course is intended as a companion to Sociology.

    ½ unit of credit; Prerequisite: None

    FACING HISTORY

    The course begins with a study of the individual and society, the development of stereotypes and prejudices and their impact on history and historical decision-making. Students will study the rise of the Nazis, conformity and obedience, the Holocaust, bystanders and rescuers, judgment and the Nuremberg trials, the historical legacies of the Holocaust, and other human rights crises of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.  The culminating activity of the course will focus on the ability of the individual to choose to participate and to become an upstander in times of crisis.

    ½ unit of credit; Prerequisite: None

     

    AMERICAN HISTORY THROUGH MUSICALS

    This course would explore the American past through musicals such Hamilton, Ragtime, 1776, Allegiance, The Civil War, Fiorello, Come From Away, Parade and Bloody, Bloody Andrew Jackson. While exploring these musicals, students will evaluate what kinds of stories about the American past are being told and what we can learn from these messages. They will ask questions like:

    • Whose voices are being heard and who is left out?
    • What is the plot, who are the characters of each show and what does each say about the time period when it was produced and what do our reactions say about our own moment in time?
    • How do the narratives told in these musicals compare with the narratives told in our history classes?

     

    Curriculum summary:

    Course content will be approached thematically and chronologically.  Each musical will be introduced with an analysis and overview of the major theme of the musicals, then students will be given the book of the musical to examine the theme and the perspective of each musical, the final stage will be to watch all or excerpts from each musical. The course would focus on:

    • Hamilton
    • 1776
    • Bloody, Bloody Andrew Jackson
    • The Civil War
    • Ragtime
    • Parade
    • Fiorello
    • Allegiance
    • Come From Away

     

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite: None

     

    SOCIAL STUDIES 12- COLLEGE SOCIAL WORK 

    New York State requires that high school students take a semester of Politics and Government and a semester of Economics as a fourth year of Social Studies in their senior year. The State accepts a variety of options that fulfill the P&G requirement, one of which is community service. This Introduction to Social Work course will meet New York State requirements for graduation in that, in essence, it will be framed more as a social policy course than [therapeutic] social work, per se. In addition, this course will provide an opportunity for students to be exposed to learning experiences focused on serving others. 

    Curriculum summary: This course will begin with a brief survey of the history of social work in this country and the formation of social policy. Selected topics will then include:
    Settlement House during the Progressive Era; Immigration; Poverty and Homelessness;
    Diversity and Social Justice; populations at Risk: racial minorities; women; children; the elderly; LGBT youth; and the disabled.

    Selected students will have the opportunity to earn 3 college credits for this course and
    1 unit of [high school credit]

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of 10th and 11th grade social studies classes plus passage of BOTH New York State Regents exams: Global History II and United States History and Government.

     

    INTRODUCTION TO RACIAL JUSTICE

    This course is designed to help students gain knowledge about race as it has been constructed in the United States and around the globe. The curriculum is designed to have students develop an awareness of their own racial socialization and skills for engaging in productive conversations about race, racism, and social justice. Discussions and readings will draw from a variety of the social sciences including history, psychology, political science and sociology.  Works of fiction, non-fiction, primary sources, historical documents, current events, art, film, and other forms of media will be incorporated throughout the course to serve as talking points for classroom discourse, research, and presentation, to widen students’ cultural lens. The course will be open to juniors and seniors. 

    ½ unit of credit; Prerequisite: None

     

    SOCIOLOGY

    The Sociology elective focuses on different aspects of human behavior and life. The class focuses on how ethics vary in different cultures, groups and societies, the cultural trends that affect how society operates, and how to work well with people from different backgrounds. Students will also learn about the political and economic aspects of sociology in cultures around the world, what stereotypes and prejudices people from other cultures endure. This course of study will foster students’ developing a clear understanding of how people interact as individuals and in groups on an everyday basis. In this course, students will be able to compare and contrast their daily lives, cultural norms, and their relationship with family and friends with that of other people from around the globe. The course will cover topics such as characteristics of adolescence, dating, types of social interaction, diversity within society, the American class system and urban life.

    ½ Unit of credit; Prerequisite: None

    AP COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS

    AP Comparative Government and Politics is an introductory college-level course in comparative government and politics. The course uses a comparative approach to examine the political structures; policies; and political, economic, and social challenges of six selected countries: China, Iran, Mexico, Nigeria, Russia, and the United Kingdom. Students cultivate their understanding of comparative government and politics through analysis of data and text-based sources as they explore topics like power and authority, legitimacy and stability, democratization, internal and external forces, and methods of political analysis.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite: None

    AP MACROECONOMICS 

    Advanced Placement Macroeconomics is a college level course where students will explore various principles of economics including economic indicators and the business cycle, employment and inflation, international trade, and the effects of fiscal and monetary policy on economic growth.  In addition, students will learn about how federal and local government economic policy actions affect income, unemployment, and inflation.  Throughout the course students will analyze graphs, charts, data, historic trends, and current events to explain economic concepts. 

    AP Macroeconomics is a full year course and the students are required to take The AP Macroeconomics exam in May.  Assessments for the class will include long term projects, weekly assignments, and a variety of summative and formative assessments that reflect the format of the AP Macroeconomics examination.  

    This course is open to 12th grade students who show interest in the subject and are committed to exploring the inner workings of the United States economy using the lens of macroeconomics.

    This course will meet the 12th grade Social Studies requirements for graduation.

    1 unit of credit                                                                                                                   Prerequisite: None

     

    New Course for 2024-2025

    FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY 

    This course analyzes psychological theories relating to aggression and criminal violence; this course focuses on the incidence and forms of violent criminal behavior in all types of surroundings. The units of study will include: historical, medical and developmental and cultural  perspectives in psychology, gang and school violence, hate crimes, violence against and by women, serial murders and the impact of media on crime.

    Selected students will have the opportunity to earn 3 college credits through the Long Island University High School Scholars Program. for this course and ½ unit of [high school credit                                            

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite: Successful completion of 10th and 11th  grade social studies classes

     

    WORLD LANGUAGES

    The World Languages program is designed to meet the needs of students who demonstrate varying levels of proficiency.  Unusual language experience or aptitude could accelerate language acquisition; therefore, the Language Department continuously evaluates students to ensure proper pacing and placement.

    The study of foreign languages is an integral part of secondary education.  It is clear that in today’s global society, proficiency in a foreign language will be necessary in order to face the difficult challenge of our contemporary world.  The increasing interdependence of all nations, the sensitivity of international relations and international trade have created a crucial need for foreign language proficiency.

    The World Languages Department offers courses in five languages.  Mandarin Chinese, French, Hebrew, Latin, and Spanish are offered in three, four, and five unit sequences. 

    Spanish students will take a final examination at the end of grade 8.  A determination will be made based on the final course grade as to whether students will be recommended for the three-year Regents equivalency sequence or the four-year Regents equivalency sequence.  Those students approved for the three-year Regents equivalency sequence will take the Regents equivalency exam at the end of the tenth grade.  Students approved for the four-year Regents equivalency sequence will take the Regents equivalency exam at the end of 11th grade.  Generally, students who start their first foreign language in the ninth grade will be in the four-year Regents equivalency sequence. 

    A chart below identifies typical sequences of study for students of varying ability levels in foreign language

     

    CHINESE (Mandarin)

     

    MANDARIN CHINESE I

    This is a foundation course for the student with little or no background in Mandarin dialect and/or reading knowledge of Chinese characters. The basics of pronunciation, simple conversation, and character writing will be introduced. Students will study Chinese culture.

    1 unit of credit; No prerequisite

    MANDARIN CHINESE 9

    A continuation of Chinese I, with further development of both conversational and reading skills.  Appreciation for Chinese culture continues to be developed.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Chinese 1 or Chinese 8

    MANDARIN CHINESE 10

    This course seeks to develop more advanced speaking and writing skills in Mandarin. Chinese culture will also be explored. This course will culminate in a comprehensive exam, which fulfills the NYS Regents requirement.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Chinese 9

     

    MANDARIN CHINESE 11/ 11H

    This course will continue to develop all four language skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Special attention will be paid to the study of traditional and modern Chinese culture as well as the study of characters.  Chinese 11H is essentially the first half of an extended AP curriculum that culminates with the AP Exam taken in the subsequent year. Students choosing not to explore this path (Chinese 11) will have a modified curriculum, differentiated so that the student may continue their language study and acquisition in Chinese.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite: Chinese 10 and Department recommendation

     

    CHINESE 12/ADVANCED PLACEMENT

    This course develops a high level of proficiency in Chinese.  Conversational ability is directed toward extended discourse, comprehension of texts on a wide variety of topics, and competent reaction orally and in writing to materials presented for listening and reading. 

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Chinese 11H and Department recommendation

    FRENCH

    FRENCH I

    This is a beginning audio-lingual course which emphasizes basic communication skills in the foreign language.  It is an introduction to French culture.

    1 unit of credit; No prerequisite

     

    FRENCH 9

    This course is designed for students who began their study of French in grade 6, completed French grade 8, or completed French I as a second foreign language.  While the development of audio-lingual skills continues to be stressed, increasing emphasis is placed on the acquisition of proficiency in reading and writing.  Cultural study will be enlarged with selected materials from contemporary magazines, short stories, poems and visuals.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  French in grade 8 or French I

     

    FRENCH 10

    Designed for students who have successfully completed French 9.  Language concepts will move from the concrete to the abstract.  Students will continue to develop audio-lingual skills while reading and writing will be stressed on a more advanced level.  Cultural understanding will evolve with increasing mastery of the language.

    Selected issues on contemporary French society will be discussed with the aid of periodicals and newspapers. Students must take the Regents equivalency Examination at the end of French 10.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  French 9

     

    FRENCH 11/11H

    This course will continue to develop all four language skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Special attention will be paid to linguistic, cultural, historical and contemporary aspects of francophone civilization. French 11H is essentially the first half of an extended AP curriculum that culminates with the AP Exam taken in the subsequent year.  Students choosing not to explore this path (French 11) will have a modified curriculum, differentiated so that the student may continue their language study and acquisition in French.

     

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  French 10 and Department     recommendation

    FRENCH 12

    This course is specifically designed as an advanced conversation course in French.  Problems of contemporary society will be discussed through the study of selected essays by significant writers, sociologists and journalists of modern France.

    French television programs, films, as well as a variety of audio-lingual materials will be utilized to foster individual oral mastery of the French language.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  French 11

     

    ADVANCED PLACEMENT FRENCH

    WHO SHOULD TAKE A.P. FRENCH?

    You should consider taking A.P. French Language if you have a firm grasp of the fundamen­tals of the language and a high degree of competence in listening comprehension, reading, speaking and writing. The abilities to think critically and to do literary analysis are necessary for success in the course.  The prospective A.P. student should have an "A" average in all previous courses.  In addition, you must be able to do independent study outside the classroom for utilization in class.  A willingness to concentrate on developing a greater degree of proficiency, an ability to give oral reports and constant daily participation in class are requisites.

     

    WHAT WILL BE EXPECTED OF ME?

    Over the summer, prior to the start of the A.P. course, you will be expected to do readings, write papers and record your speaking.  During the year, you will be required to submit various papers, and oral presentations.  You must be prepared to complete a minimum of six - eight hours of preparation outside the classroom per week and to complete the reading and writing assignments.

    You will be prepared and required to take the A.P. exam in May.  Grades will be determined solely on the mastery of the A.P. curriculum.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  French 11H and Department recommendation. 

    Those not receiving the department recommendation will be required to meet with counselor, chairperson of the Foreign Language Department, and parents to ensure full awareness of the high level of commitment and skill required to succeed in French A.P.

    HEBREW

    HEBREW I

    This is a foundation course for the student with little or no background in Hebrew. Emphasis will be on the development of the four language skills:  listening, speaking, reading, and writing. 

    1 unit of credit; No prerequisite

     

    HEBREW 9

    A continuation of Hebrew I.  In addition to more advanced grammar and word study, emphasis will be placed on oral comprehension exercises of intermediate difficulty.  Selected and adapted works related to Israeli culture will be read.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Hebrew I, 8 or departmental approval

     

    HEBREW 10

    A thorough review of spoken and written contemporary Hebrew and introduction to classical Hebrew structures will be made.  Continued development of oral fluency and the ability to read extensively will be stressed.  Cultural studies will include readings, lectures and reports on classical and contemporary mores.  The Regents equivalency Examination will be required at the end of this course. 

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite: Hebrew 9 or departmental approval

     

    HEBREW 11/11H

    This course will explore Israeli culture through the use of dialogues, interviews and library/internet sources.  Students will be able to choose those areas of interest to them; i.e., Israeli poetry including Amichai and Rachel, literature, current events, or journal articles.  Individual reports and papers will be required.  Some contemporary Israeli films will be studied and discussed. 

    Continued emphasis will be placed on all language skills at an advanced level.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Hebrew 10 or departmental approval

     

    HEBREW 12/12H

    A continuation of Hebrew 11/11H, this course will be offered to students who are interested in studying the different aspects of Israeli life through problem solving techniques.  Contemporary authors, newspapers, periodicals, and films will be studied in this course.  Emphasis will be placed on oral performance in the foreign language at a level of sophistication appropriate to advanced study.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Hebrew 11 or departmental approval

     

    HEBREW SEMINAR

    This course will be offered to students having successfully completed Hebrew 12.  Works of several major contemporary authors and thematic studies of Israeli culture will be selected by students.  In addition, students will be expected to do numerous oral and written projects during each semester.  Independent projects will be authorized and planned cooperatively with the teacher.

    1 unit of credit

     

    LATIN

    LATIN I

    This introductory course is designed for students interested in learning Latin and its culture, including mythology and Roman history. Students will strengthen their knowledge of English vocabulary and grammar, important components of standardized testing, such as the SAT exams.

    1 unit of credit; No prerequisite

     

    LATIN 9

    This course is a continuation of Latin 8 or Latin I.  Emphasis is placed on vocabulary acquisition, translation, the principals of grammar and syntax, reading and writing, and etymology.  A survey of Classical Mythology as well as an overview of Ancient Roman history is also covered.  Class projects include writing and performing a one-act play based on a myth as well as contributing comics, riddles, and poems to the Latin magazine.  Text:  Latin Via Ovid

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Latin I/8

    LATIN 10

    This course, an anthology of Roman authors, will review all elementary and advanced grammar, as well as introduce syntax particular to certain writers.  Emphasis is placed on reading comprehension and translation.  Readings include selections both from the prose of Caesar, Livy, Cicero, Sallust, and from the poetry of Ovid, Catullus, and Vergil.  A detailed survey of Roman Republican and Imperial politics will also be covered.  Class projects include a mock trial of Brutus.  This course will culminate in a comprehensive exam, which fulfills the NYS Regents requirement.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Latin 9

     

    LATIN 11/11H

    This course is a continuation of Latin 10. Emphasis is put on poetry and Latin poetics, as exhibited in the work of Catullus, Vergil and Ovid. Advanced study of Latin grammar and syntax is a significant component of this course.  Students will be introduced to aspects of the AP curriculum. Students choosing not to explore a path which culminates in the AP exam in the subsequent year (Latin 11) will have a modified curriculum, differentiated so that the student may continue their language study and acquisition in Latin.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Latin 10

     

    ADVANCED PLACEMENT LATIN/ LATIN 12

    A detailed study of an author or two with emphasis on the translation and interpretation of selections from Latin poetry.  About two thousand lines are required to be read and understood.  Topics covered include literary criticism, meter, grammar, and literary devices.  An ability to translate about thirty lines per night and to write brief, clear essays that explain any aspect of the passages are vital to success.  Passages must be prepared nightly and reviewed during class.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Latin 11H and Department Recommendation; Prerequisite:  Hebrew 12 or departmental approval

     

    SPANISH

    SPANISH I

    An introductory level language course which emphasizes the development of the four language skills: ability to speak, understand, read and write elementary Spanish.  Introduction to Spanish culture.  This course is for students who have no previous experience with Spanish.

    1 unit of credit; No prerequisite

     

    SPANISH II

    This course is open to students who have successfully completed one year of Spanish and who have been recommended for the four-year Regents equivalency sequence.  An audio-lingual approach is used with additional emphasis in reading and writing skills.  Cultural study will be enlarged with selected materials from short stories, magazines, visuals, and student oral presentations.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Spanish I or Spanish 8

    SPANISH 9

    This course is designed for students who began their study of Spanish in Grade 6, completed Spanish 8 and scored high in the placement exam in Grade 8 or completed Spanish II.  While the development of audio-lingual skills continues to be stressed, increasing emphasis is placed on the acquisition of proficiency in reading and writing.  Cultural study will be enlarged with selected reading materials and visuals.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Spanish 8/II

    SPANISH III

    The practice of skills is continued, while more emphasis is placed on reading and writing than previously. Students' interests are considered in selection of conversational topics and reading materials. Authentic texts, videos, and podcasts are used to familiarize students with modern life in Spanish speaking countries. This Spanish class uses comprehension-based methods of language instruction. Spanish language and culture are taught simultaneously in order for students to develop cultural understanding while building proficiency.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite: Spanish 8/II

    SPANISH 10

    Spanish 10 prepares students for the Regents equivalency exam at the end of the year.  This class combines students who have successfully completed Spanish 9.  All four language skills are emphasized-listening, speaking, reading and writing.  The curriculum also focuses on the culture and literature of all Spanish speaking countries.  This course will culminate in a comprehensive exam, which fulfills the NYS Regents requirement.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Spanish 9

    SPANISH IV

    Spanish IV prepares students for the Regents equivalency exam at the end of the year.  The course consists of thematic units selected according to the New York State syllabus. They serve to increase conversational abilities, and the ability to write and to read. This Spanish class uses comprehension-based methods of language instruction. Spanish language and culture are taught simultaneously in order for students to develop cultural understanding while building proficiency.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite: Spanish 9/III

    SPANISH 11 (Dual enrollment option)

    This course is designed for students who have successfully completed Spanish 10/IV.  Students will continue to develop their communication skills in a curriculum based on their interests and preferences.  Individual and group projects will be assigned regularly. Please note that students not pursuing the AP program may register for this course.  *Students will have the option to earn college credit through a local university.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Spanish 10/IV

     

    SPANISH 11H

    Spanish 11H is essentially the first half of an extended AP curriculum that culminates with the AP Exam taken in the subsequent year. This course is designed for students who have successfully completed Spanish 10 and have intentions of continuing to Spanish AP.  Continued emphasis will be placed on conversational and syntactical skills, and on usage and understanding of the Spanish language.  Linguistic, cultural, and literary aspects of Hispanic civilization will be explored and conversational proficiency will be emphasized.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Spanish 10, minimum of 90 average for course, 90 on Regents equivalency Exam and

    Department recommendation

    SPANISH 12 (Dual enrollment option)

    This course is designed to continue the development of all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing at an advanced level.  Spanish 12 will include units of study in Hispanic history, politics and customs.  Films, newspapers, and magazines articles will be used to enhance cultural awareness, as well as to improve language proficiency.  Students will also analyze and create original works and develop projects.  Please note that students not pursuing the AP program may register for this course.  *Students will have the option to earn college credit through a local university.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  Spanish 11/11H or Spanish10/IV, if enrolling as a senior.

    ADVANCED PLACEMENT SPANISH

    WHO SHOULD TAKE A.P. SPANISH?

    You should consider taking A.P. Spanish if you have a firm mastery of auditory comprehen­sion, speaking, reading and writing skills.  The abilities to think critically and to do literary analysis are necessary for success in this course.  The prospective student for A.P. Spanish should have an "A" average in all previous Spanish courses.  In addition, you must be able to do independent study outside of class for utilization within the classroom.  A willingness and an ability to give oral presentations in front of the class and constant daily participation in class are requisites.

     

    WHAT WILL BE EXPECTED OF ME?

    You will be required to have assignments turned in on time and to be prepared daily.  Assignments are given well in advance and it is your responsibility to organize your time wisely.  You must be prepared to spend from six-to eight hours of outside preparation per week to adequately complete all reading and writing assignments.  You will be required to prepare for and take the A.P. exam in May.  The difficulty of the exam is equivalent to the third year of foreign language study at the university level.  A summer reading will be assigned with an essay and packet due the first day of school.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite: Spanish 11H and Department recommendation*

     

    *Those not receiving the department recommendation will be required to meet with counselor, chairperson of the Foreign Language Department, and parents to ensure full awareness of the high level of commitment and skill required to succeed in A.P. Spanish.

     

    SPECIAL EDUCATION

    All students who received special education service are classified by the Committee on Special Education.  Special education programs are designed to meet student’s educational needs.  North High School offers the following special education programs.

    RESOURCE ROOM

    Special education teachers provide instruction in small class setting with a maximum of five students per period.  Instruction is individualized for each student depending on his/her specific educational disability.  The goal of resource room support is for students to learn compensatory strategies and study skills in order to enable them to succeed in Regents level classes.

    INCLUSION CLASSES

    Inclusion classes are Regents level classes in which students with disabilities are integrated with general education students.  The special education students receive academic support by having a special education teacher present in the class and by having an alternate-day support lab taught by the same special education teacher.  In the academic support labs, important concepts and vocabulary are pre-taught and reinforced so that students with educational disabilities can achieve their full potential in Regents classes.

    SELF-CONTAINED CLASSES

    Self contained special education classes in English, social studies, math and science are designed for classified students who demonstrate a need for additional support in a classroom with a smaller student/teacher ratio.  These classes are aligned with the Regents curriculum and prepare students for the required Regents exam in each of the core subject areas.  The goal of each Foundations class is to balance the rigors of a Regents level curriculum, yet still provide students with additional academic support and a level of instruction that is individualized to meet the learning style of each student. 

    SPEECH AND LANGUAGE SERVICES

    The speech and language program provides services for classified students who exhibit communication and language processing difficulties. It also provides support and remediation for students in the areas of articulation, fluency and voice production. 

    ACADEMIC AND CAREER EDUCATION (ACE)

    This program is designed to meet both the academic and career needs for students whose abilities are limited.  Academics are offered in addition to career development, vocational training and on-site employment within the community. 

    THE TRANSITION PROGRAM

    Functional life skills are necessary for everyday living.  They include the areas of home, community, social and employment. 

    The purpose of the Transition Program is to give young adults who have completed their high school experience the skills, tools, and support needed to achieve personal and vocational goals, self-confidence, and independence until the age of 21. 

     

    STUDY SKILLS CENTER

    Academic Assistance Services

     

    The Study Skills Center offers classes for all grades and addresses a wide range of abilities. Students receive help with their academic course work in which they are struggling.  Pre-teaching and review are included in instruction. Emphasis is placed on reading comprehension of materials in all curriculum.  Skills and instructional strategies are addressed in the context of the content material.  Skills that are addressed are those necessary for success in all classes.  These skills include: time management and organizational skills, test taking strategies, detail writing from expository material, the use of interpreting graphics and visual aids (such as webs, cause -effect, charts and outlines), vocabulary development, critical reading/writing/thinking, and thematic document-based essay writing.

     

    This course can be taken for one semester or the full year. 

     

    Grading is on a Pass/Fail basis. No prerequisite

     

    ENGLISH AS A NEW LANGUAGE

    (ENL)

    These courses are specifically designed for those students who are learning English as a new language.  An English as a New Language [ENL] teacher will assure that English language learners (ELLs) are provided opportunities to achieve the same educational goals and standards as the general student population.

    The English as a New Language program is offered at multiple levels designed to develop skills in understanding, speaking, reading, writing and communicating in English.  Content area instruction in English is supported by ENL methodologies employed in a systematic and structured way.

    Placement into classes in the ENL Program is based upon results of either the New York State Identification Test for English Language Learners (NYSITELL) or the New York State English as a New Language Achievement Test (NYSESLAT).  The (NYSITELL) is administered only ONCE to a student upon arrival into a public school in New York State and is used to identify a student’s eligibility for ENL services.  All incoming students who live in a home where a language other the English is spoken, as confirmed by the Home Language Survey, are tested upon admission to a public school in New York State.

    Every spring, students who are classified as English Language Learners (ELLs) must take the NYSESLAT exam to measure their growth in the four English Language Skills from year to year.  The scores on the NYSESLAT indicate the proficiency level the student has achieved each year and determine placement in ENL classes for the following fall semester.  NYSESLAT proficiency levels are Entering, Emerging, Transitioning, Expanding and      Commanding.  Within each level there are degrees of ability.  The subdivisions of each proficiency level describe the spectrum of proficiency and growth more realistically than an aggregate description of the level.  Even if a student scores at the Commanding Level in each of the four language skills to exit the ENL program, he/she may take an advanced level ENL course as transitional support upon recommendation or self-selection.

    ENGLISH AS A NEW LANGUAGE I

    This course is designed for Entering level ENL students with little or no proficiency in English.

    Registration is required for students who are recommended by the English Language Learners team.

     

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  ELL Team approval

    ENGLISH AS A NEW LANGUAGE II

    This course is designed for ENL students who have basic interpersonal communicative skills in English but need to develop their academic language proficiency in English. Registration is required for students who are recommended by the English Language Learners team. 

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  ELL Team approval

    ENGLISH AS A NEW LANGUAGE III

    This course is designed for ENL students to further strengthen their academic language proficiency in English in order to be successful in all content-area classes.

    Registration is required for students who are recommended by the English Language Learners team.  All classes will meet one period daily for one year.

    1 unit of credit; Prerequisite:  ELL Team approval

     

    ENL ENGLISH 9

    This course is offered as a one-time English class to prepare an ENL student for entrance into a comprehensive Regents level course.  Through individualized and small group instruction, this ENL English class will provide ENL students with opportunities to read, write, discuss, and relate to various literary genres such as short stories, poems, novels, and plays.

    1 unit of English credit; Prerequisite:  Department approval

     

    ENL ENGLISH 10

    This course prepares ENL students for entrance into a comprehensive Regents level course. Through individualized and small group instruction, this class will provide ENL students with opportunities to read, write, discuss, and relate to various literary genres such as short stories, poems, novels, and plays.

     

    1 credit of English; Prerequisite: Departmental approval

     

    ENL MATH

    This course covers topics generally taught in grades six through eight in preparation for the Algebra 1 curriculum. 

     

    1 credit of Mathematics; Prerequisite: Departmental approval

     

    ENL LIVING ENVIRONMENT

    This course follows the NYS Living Environment curriculum.  It also involves biochemistry, molecular biology, and the anatomy and physiology of living organisms.  Students taking this course must possess average reading skills and some knowledge of chemistry concepts.  Vocabulary is an important part of the curriculum and students will learn many new terms, take notes regularly, perform lab investigations, and write lab reports.  To be successful, students will need to spend a minimum of two hours per week on homework and preparation outside of the classroom.  The course will culminate with the Living Environment Regents exam in June and students must complete 1200 minutes of laboratory work as a prerequisite to sit for the Regents exam. 

     

    1 credit in Science; Prerequisite: Departmental approval

     

    ENL SOCIAL STUDIES 9/10

    This course is a two year course designed for ENL students and culminates with the Global History and Geography Regents Examination. Students will work with primary and secondary source documents to develop reading, writing, and analytical skills.

    1 credit of Social Studies; Prerequisite: Departmental approval

     

    HUMANITIES

    Humanities is an integrated team-taught English and Social Studies course designed especially for newcomers to Great Neck. The course is taught by three duly certified teachers- in ENL and English/Social Studies.  The Humanities Class is a double period of daily instruction for ENL students at the Entering or Emerging proficiency levels.  This double period offers students project-based learning activities to develop understanding of both English and Social Studies concepts while simultaneously developing the four language skills in English: listening, speaking, reading and writing.  This course prepares students for subsequent courses in English and Social Studies. The Humanities class employs a multidisciplinary approach to learning and incorporates technology, hands-on learning activities in music and art, and field trips.

     

    1 credit of English and 1 credit of Social Studies; Prerequisite: Departmental approval